Posts Tagged ‘SPLC’

HRC — “Anti-Trans Violence Epidemic!”

November 25, 2019

This week a new report came across our desk, “A National Epidemic: Fatal Anti-Transgender Violence in the United States in 2019,” produced by Human Rights Campaign (HRC), a large LGBTQ advocacy group headquartered in Washington, DC.

The HRC calls the document “…a distressing report honoring the at least 22 transgender people and gender non-conforming people killed in 2019 and detailing the contributing factors that lead to this tragic violence.” The implication is that these tragic deaths were all somehow hate-related, and definitely anti-Trans related, and some indeed were. Predictably, the Media picked up on the story and reprinted it faithfully, without vetting the claims.

Nobody should ever be a victim of crime, especially a hate crime or murder.

A closer look at the report shows that while it does indeed honor 22 people who died, it does little to “detail the contributing factors,” and even indulges in a little old fashioned fudging to inflate the numbers.

To be fair, the HRC is registered as a 501(c)(4) Social Welfare Organization with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), as opposed to a 501(c)(3) “action organization,” like the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and many other Hate Industry players. The only restrictions on 501(c)(4) organizations is that they “…must not be organized for profit and must be operated exclusively to promote social welfare.” As such, they are allowed to lobby lawmakers openly, whereas groups like the SPLC have to resort to more covert measures to protect their all-important tax-exempt status. More on the HRC to follow.

The report puts great emphasis on the facts that most of the people honored were Black trans women, under the age of 30 and living predominantly in the South. While these claims hold true for the people in the report, they are largely irrelevant compared to other factors.

Stats

The repeated emphasis on race alone implies that racism was a leading factor in the deaths, but a simple Google search of the deceased and those arrested in connection with their deaths proves this claim to be patently unfounded.

Nothing sells as surely as claims of racism these days, though, and so the HRC and the Media are happy to imply.

Homicides1

Homicides2

Homicides3
Homicides4
homicides5-e1574693712812.jpg
Homicides6Again, nobody should ever be a victim of crime, especially a hate crime or murder.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Black homicide victims significantly outnumber all other groups, for a variety of reasons, regardless of gender identity. The vast majority of those charged in Black homicides tend to be Black as well.HomicideRatesUS

The HRC makes the case that age is a mitigating factor:

Age1

A review of homicide statistics from 2018 shows that people under the age of 35 make up the largest share of ALL victims in the US.

Age2

The HRC report makes the case that geography may be a contributing factor, and here they may have a point, but not necessarily the one they are claiming.

Location

Location2

As the first pie chart indicates, the 2019 HRC report includes statistics going back to 2013, claiming more than 150 trans deaths over six years, or roughly 25 deaths per year.

The second pie chart indicates the population distribution for the US in 2018 and the third the LGBTQ distribution for the same year. The two charts are nearly identical, statistically, indicating a fairly uniform distribution of LGBTQ persons across all geographic locations.

A more telling graphic, and the 2019 report overall, indicates that many of the victims lived in large cities.

Location3

Again, the HRC had to reach back six years to cobble together a statistic, but the mini-biographies of the 2019 victims show that many died in the cities listed above, as well as Dallas, Houston, Kansas City, Montgomery, Memphis and Prince George’s County, Md. All of these locations have large Black populations and high annual homicide rates.

When your demographic group has far higher than average homicide rates and you choose to live in areas with far higher than average homicide rates, your odds of becoming a homicide victim become statistically higher.

Again, nobody should ever be a victim of crime, especially a hate crime or murder. We’re not “blaming the victims” here, We’re merely stating the obvious facts.

The HRC report implies that the 2019 victims died because of their transgender lifestyles, but a review of the cases indicates that, for the most part, their gender identity was not usually the motivating factor.

One exception to that rule is the fact that many transgender people, for a variety of socioeconomic reasons, are forced into the worlds of sex work and drug trafficking. The HRC report estimates that 13% to 36% of the victims may have engaged in sex work, though this figure may be conservative. The fact remains that street sex and drug dealing are highly dangerous activities.

Several of the victims were found shot to death in cars or isolated locations, late at night. While sex work is dangerous enough, transgender sex workers also run the risk of violence from johns who do not realize from the outset that the victim is transgender.

As we noted with the victims’ photos above, there is nothing to confirm that most of them died specifically for being transgender. One victim was killed while standing with a crowd of other people. Police say the shooter fired into the crowd from half a block away without targeting anyone specifically.

In a similar incident, Jordan Cofer, the only white and only transgender male listed in the report, was killed when his brother, Connor Betts, went on a shooting spree in Dayton in August, 2019, killing nine and wounding 27 more. Evidence showed that Betts had no political or racial motives for the attack. He was just a sick man who wanted to commit a mass shooting.

Another victim, described in the report as being homeless, was found in the charred remains of burned out abandoned house. Another was shot in a domestic dispute where her mother accused a man of stealing her tax refund check. John Booth, 61, allegedly pulled out a handgun and shot the victim, who was trying to defend her mother.

Jazzaline Ware, as even the HRC report mentions, died of natural causes and the report also notes that Jamagio Berryman did not identify as transgender, used he/him pronouns, and yet they too were added to the list to pad out the numbers.

So, if race and gender identity are not necessarily mitigating factors in the death of these transgender people, what is behind the Human Rights Campaign annual claim of an “epidemic” of transgender violent deaths?

As with the Southern Poverty Law Center and all Hate Industry “advocacy groups” the main purpose appears to be fundraising. There are tens of millions of donor-dollars to be gleaned by selling fear and outrage to well-meaning Progressives.

HRC online 2018 tax returns show that the organization started 2019 with 289 employees. Its president, Chad Griffin was paid $502,000 that year. Vice President Joni Madison was paid almost $302,000 and, oddly enough, Assistant Vice President Cathy Nelson pulled down $340,000. Thirteen other staffers, from lawyers to PR people to secretaries, are listed, all with six-digit salaries ranging from $262,000 to a paltry $190,000.

That’s a lot of overhead to cover, even before you pay the other 270 employees. That money has to come from somewhere.

Like the SPLC and other Hate Industry players, the Human Rights Campaign partakes in the popular “joint costs” canard, in which over $9 million dollars in fundraising costs were attributed to other departments. Some third-party fundraisers hired by the HRC took up to 84% of donations for themselves while several others charged way more than they took in, essentially keeping every dime they raised in the name of the HRC without the donors ever realizing it, a long-held SPLC practice.

Most of the HRC’s annual expenses go to lobbying lawmakers for pro-LGBT causes, which we do not have a problem with, per se. What concerns us is that, just like the SPLC’s exploitation of genuine hate crime victims, Heather Heyer of the Charlottesville riots, and “the Civil Rights Martyrs,” the Human Rights Campaign seems to have no qualms whatsoever in invoking the names of dead transgender victims and others in crass fundraising campaigns.

While nobody should ever be the victim of a crime, especially a hate crime or murder, an average of 25 victims a year, among a demographic of a million and a half estimated members does not an “epidemic” make. Among the 14,500 confirmed homicides in 2018, these unfortunates make up less than two-tenths of one percent.

The FBI gives the average US homicide rate at 5.1 victims per 100,000 citizens per year. Under that estimate, the Trans population of 1.5 million should see 77 homicides a year, as opposed to an average of 25, just for being American citizens.

The FBI gives the Black homicide rate at 20.4 victims per 100,000 per year. Under that estimate, the Black Trans population should see 308 homicides per year on average, just by virtue of being Black and young.

The National Weather Service estimates that 49 Americans are killed by lightning strikes each year across all demographics, meaning that the average transgender person is twice as likely to be struck by lightning than to be murdered for their gender identity.

As “epidemics” go, the HRC’s claims are pretty thin.

Watching the Watchdogs has added HRC to our watch list. Stay tuned.

 

SPLC — “Violent Hate Crime up in 2018!”

November 15, 2019

Nobody should ever be the victim of a crime, especially a hate crime.

Earlier this week, the Southern Poverty Law Center issued a press release making the claim that “New FBI report shows increase in violent hate crime in 2018.” As usual, the claim was picked up and repeated by the Media, and, as usual, a simple review of the source data shows that the SPLC’s claim is, shall we say, less than accurate.

In ancient times, this simple review would be known as “journalism.”

The report, authored by out-going SPLC Intelligence Project Director Heidi Beirich (more on that later), opens with a very subtle rewording of the original headline, citing the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) report for 2018, “Although the FBI report released today shows a minuscule decline in all hate crimes in 2018, it shows a 12 percent rise in hate crimes involving violence [emphasis added].”

The rewording, from “violent hate crimes” to “hate crimes involving violence” is so subtle as to be elegant. Here is what the FBI UCR actually says:

2017 2018 FBI UCR Hate Crimes - Persons

As the highlighted cells show, there was a 12% increase in the number of “crimes against persons” reported in 2018, however, violent crimes, such as murder and rape were virtually unchanged and there were 30 more aggravated assaults reported over 2017, or an increase of 4%. The FBI defines aggravated assault as:

Aggravated Assault—An unlawful attack by one person upon another wherein the offender uses a weapon or displays it in a threatening manner, or the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness.

This also includes assault with disease (as in cases when the offender is aware that he/she is infected with a deadly disease and deliberately attempts to inflict the disease by biting, spitting, etc.)

Nobody should ever be the victim of a crime, especially a hate crime.

The UCR report does show an increase in simple assaults, defined as:

Simple Assault—An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness

No weapon. No obvious bodily injury. Any incident where one party lays hands on another, such as pushing or shoving, qualifies as a simple assault, though calling that a violent crime is quite a stretch, even for the SPLC.

A drunken fist fight outside a bar at midnight might meet Dr. Beirich’s claim of a crime with violence, but it hardly qualifies as a lynching. The UCR report does not break its simple assault incidents into hard categories. There is no way to sort out the truly violent incidents from the others.

The other category showing an increase of 232 incidents over 2017 is intimidation:

Intimidation—To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack

By definition, there is no violence involved in intimidation. These incidents may qualify as “crimes against persons” (making up a full 45% of that category) but not as crimes with violence and definitely not as violent crimes. While nobody should ever be placed in fear of harm, intimidation is entirely subjective.

Another major factor to consider is that while the UCR reports alleged “incidents,” these incidents are not actual crimes, even hate crimes, until determined by a court of law. In many cases, charges are dropped or never filed at all. The UCR’s Methodology section highlights the inherent difficulties in proving deliberate bias in a crime:

Because motivation is subjective, it is sometimes difficult to know with certainty whether a crime resulted from the offender’s bias. Moreover, the presence of bias alone does not necessarily mean that a crime can be considered a hate crime. Only when a law enforcement investigation reveals sufficient evidence to lead a reasonable and prudent person to conclude that the offender’s actions were motivated, in whole or in part, by his or her bias, should an agency report an incident as a hate crime.

At the end of the day, the 2018 UCR shows only a minor uptick in alleged violent crimes with 30 more aggravated assault claims in 2018 over 2017. There were 232 more simple assault claims over the same period but there is no way to determine shoving matches from fist fights, and even then, any serious violence would have elevated the incident to an aggravated assault.

In short, there’s not a lot here to base any serious claims of increased violent hate crimes based on an increase of alleged hate “incidents.” Heidi Beirich knows this, but her customer base, the Media and SPLC donors, are shopping for fear and outrage and Dr. B. is only to happy to accommodate them.

Interestingly, Dr. Beirich notes that “About 27 percent of all hate crimes in 2018 – the largest share among all categories – were motivated by anti-black bias.” This would seem to indicate that three-quarters of all alleged incidents, (not necessarily actual crimes) were NOT directed at blacks, which would seem like a positive.

Ironically, the same FBI UCR report claims that at least 24% of the accused perpetrators were black. In fact, the SPLC claims that black “hate groups” make up 23% of the alleged total, and the “largest share among all categories,” nationwide. Apparently, those stats are not as important as Beirich’s “27 percent” claim. There’s no outrage to be gained.

While Dr. Beirich’s claim of a 12% increase in “crimes with violence” seems significant, she writes off the corresponding 15% drop in alleged hate crimes against property in 2018 as “minuscule.”

Speaking of crimes against property, it is worth noting that not all “hate incidents” in the UCR report are created equal.

2017 2018 FBI UCR Hate Crimes - Property

Crimes against property make up 37% of the 2018 incident total right off the top (all confirmable non-violent alleged incidents make up 65% of the total, which does not include non-violent simple assaults).

While we can see how one could make a case for bias-related arson, some robberies and targeted vandalism, we are admittedly at a loss as to how stealing one’s car or burglarizing one’s home are hate crimes. The same is true of Crimes against Society, which, according to the FBI, are “typically victimless crimes” that include gambling, prostitution and drug dealing.

Dr. Beirich’s “report” closes with the obligatory anti-Trump allegation and her boilerplate claim that “250,000 people are victimized by hate crimes every year.” Since Heidi Beirich announced a few weeks ago that she is leaving the scandal-ridden company she has served for twenty years, we want to sincerely wish her the best of luck in her future endeavors.

For the past ten years, Dr. Beirich and her former boss, Mark Potok, have given us here at Watching the Watchdogs more information, more fodder, more smoking guns as to the inner workings of the Southern Poverty Law Center and lesser Hate Industry players. Due to Mr. Potok’s abrupt and mysterious departure from the company a few years ago, we were not able to wish him a proper fond farewell, but for Dr. Beirich we have this parting gift:

Let us assume that the good doctor’s estimate of 250,000 hate crime victims a year, which, as we have seen, includes people who were shoved, called bad names, had their car stolen, bought weed on the street and/or hired a hooker, is spot on, with no questions asked.

That statistic works out to .07%, or seven hundredths of one percent, of the current US population. Hate crimes really do happen. Your odds of being a victim of a hate crime are extremely small. Your odds of being a victim of a violent hate crime, even using Dr. Beirich’s “generous” statistics are infinitesimal.

Nobody should ever be the victim of a crime, especially a hate crime.

Bon voyage, Heidi. You will be missed.

SPLC — More Fundraising Shenanigans

October 10, 2019

Skimming through the news feeds and found several articles touting the fact that the Southern Poverty Law Center says it has registered over 1,300 new voters in Mississippi. Any effort to increase voter participation is to be commended.

At least one Mississippi news outlet made the dubious claim that:

“The Southern Poverty Law Center doesn’t support any candidate. They are a non-partisan organization. Their message is to educate people about the process.”

“Non-partisan”? Really? Considering the company’s huge donor list was built upon those of the McGovern, Carter, Ted Kennedy and Hart presidential campaigns, it seems likely that they are extremely partial to those of the political persuasion that gave them $122 million donor-dollars in 2018, and another $133 million the year before.

As far as not supporting any candidate, maybe not, but they most definitely denigrate the current occupant of the White House and his party. One need only Google the terms “SPLC” and “Trump” to find several years’ worth of vitriolic rhetoric.

We tried it ourselves and the first hit we got was this impartial plea.

Tell President Trump to Take Responsibility-Header

The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine first noted this web page on August 19, 2017, just a week after the Charlottesville riots, but it was likely posted a few days earlier.

The page makes the damning claim that “President Trump’s campaign and presidency have energized the white supremacist movement in unprecedented ways,” but provides no proof to back up the claim. If the SPLC has a “smoking gun” that Trump has “energized” white supremacists, they need only produce it.

Three years later and we’re still waiting…

The text continues: “At this point, it’s not enough for Trump simply to condemn bigotry. He must take responsibility for the surge in white supremacy and hate that he has unleashed.

The events in Charlottesville demand nothing less.

And what can decent, caring people do to help? Simply fill in a form!

Tell President Trump to Take Responsibility-Submit

And what happens when the Righteous push the big blue “Submit” button? Apparently, nothing that the president will ever see. Not only is there no text box with which to “tell the president” anything, an examination of the underlying source code shows no links to the White House email address or even Mr. Trump’s twitter account. It does show more than two dozen links to “splcenter.org,” however.

Once again, the SPLC has set up a dummy form calling people to some kind of virtuous action only to deliver their personal contact information to their own huge, in-house fundraising machine.

Once again, the company stooped to invoking Charlottesville to whip up fear and outrage to turn a buck. How cynical is that?

Vaya con Dinero, SPLC.

SPLC — More Hate Map-Inspired Violence?

September 8, 2019

Most readers are familiar with the 2012 attempted mass shooting in Washington, DC, where 28-year-old Floyd Corkins walked into the lobby of the Family Research Council (FRC) with the intent of murdering as many staffers as he could. Fortunately, the FRC office manager, Leonardo Johnson, was able to subdue Corkins until police arrived, despite having been shot by Corkins during the struggle.

Corkins, a Gay rights activist, told FBI investigators, in no uncertain terms, that he had identified the FRC as an anti-LGBT “hate group” based on that designation on a Southern Poverty Law Center “Hate Map.”

The SPLC, which goes to great lengths to try to tie lone-wolf shooters to any right-wing ideology they can find, immediately dismissed claims that their “Hate Map” fundraising tool had inspired Corkins in any way.

If it hadn’t been for the “Hate Map,” it’s unlikely that Corkins would ever have heard of the FRC. Instead, Corkins pled guilty to three felony charges, including of committing an act of terrorism while armed, receiving a 25-year sentence for his crimes.

Yesterday we learned that a self-identified Antifa member, Alexander Dial, 37, had been charged with “…one count of felony riotone count of second-degree assaultone count of second-degree unlawful use of an electrical stun gun, tear gas or mace, and one count of fourth-degree assault,” during the so-called “End Domestic Terrorism” rally in Portland, OR, on August 17.

Dial Antifa2

Alexander Dial, 2019

The article, posted on the BizPac Review website, includes a number of video links posted by journalist and Antifa documentarian Andy Ngo, which show numerous instances of Antifa thugs attacking Alt-Right thugs with hammers, clubs and chemical sprays. Alexander Dial, who goes by the Twitter handle “betacuck4lyfe” appears in several of the segments.

As a result of Dial’s arrest, a GoFundMe site was created to help raise money for his legal costs.

The blurb on the site makes no attempt to deny Dial’s participation in the violence, even posting a photo of Mr. Dial in action, (note the same “Beta Cuck” t-shirt as shown above).

Dial Antifa

“As many of you are aware, the man you see in the right side of the photograph in the red helmet  is Alexander Dial (trending on Twitter as #betacuck4lyfe), a protestor who was defending Portland, Oregon along with a large group of local citizens against SPLC-designated hate groups who had invaded the downtown area without permits in order to spread their rhetoric of intolerance. “

“Unfortunately, the Portland Police arrested Alexander during this demonstration and have chosen to criminally prosecute him. These are serious charges and he needs your help now!”

Inevitably, despite this kind of irrefutable documentation, the SPLC and the Media routinely refer to Antifa as peaceful “counter-protestors” even when they are clearly as violent, or even more-so, than the alt-Right thugs they claim to be protesting.

Even Antifa admits to and glorifies the violence in Portland. They posted the photo of Dial allegedly attacking the alt-Right members on their own GoFundMe site intentionally, to raise as much money from sympathetic donors as possible.

The site also implies that Dial and the other Antifa members selected their targets based on “SPLC-designated hate groups” and that their motivation for the attacks was to stop the spread of “their rhetoric of intolerance.” In short, to censor their ideological opponents by any means necessary, including criminal violence.

There are several ironies here that are too good to ignore, not least of which is the fact that it was real Fascist Brownshirt goons who would use “any means necessary” to break up Communist Party meetings in Germany, nearly a century ago. Antifa, who claim to be champions of “tolerance” and admirers of Soviet Communism, are engaging in the very Fascist acts they claim to abhor.

The reference to “invad[ing] the downtown area without permits” is also laughable, considering Antifa claims to be an anarchist organization, but suddenly they are worried about permits when it suits their cause? In fact, the alt-Right thugs who marched in 2017’s “Unite the Right” riots in Charlottesville had permits, which didn’t stop the Left-wing thugs from showing up to battle them.

Perhaps the sweetest irony of all comes near the end of the GoFundMe blurb:

“Transparency is very important to [Dial]. Any extra money donated that is not spent as described above will be donated to the ACLU without exception.”

Is it possible that Antifa adherents have no knowledge of the ACLU’s history of defending the free speech rights of the very people they are attacking, including fighting for the right of neo-Nazis to march in heavily-Jewish Skokie, Illinois, in the 1970s?

In fact, the ONLY reason Jason Kessler obtained a permit for his “Unite the Right” rally in 2017 was BECAUSE the ACLU went to bat for him in court, AGAINST the City of Charlottesville!

“Ironic” is the only term when a self-described “tolerant” group bent on censorship gives money to one of the biggest advocates of free speech in the country, no matter how abhorrent many may find that speech.

At the end of the day, it is the six-digit-salary execs at the SPLC and other Hate Industry organizations who are the big winners every time thug meets thug. SPLC donations nearly tripled between 2016 to 2017, from $50 million to $132 million, based largely on the Charlottesville riots and the annual “Hate Map” fundraising tool.

It is in the SPLC’s financial interest to agitate their Progressive donor base and Antifa leftist thugs whenever possible. Real peace would cut into profits.

 

SPLC — “White Nationalists on the Rise!”

September 1, 2019

Ever since the Southern Poverty Law Center released its “Hate Map” fundraising tool for 2018 this past February, the party line has been that “White Nationalist groups are on the rise!” The SPLC bolsters this claim by noting that it had assigned 100 White Nationalist “hate groups” to the US for 2017 and that number had exploded by 48% to 148 for 2018.

Scary news, no doubt, until you recall that the SPLC is the sole arbiter of the “hate group” label. It can claim as many alleged groups as it likes for a given year and nobody in the Media will bother to vet the company’s claims.

Fortunately, we at Watching the Watchdogs are more than happy to take a look. Using nothing more than a desktop computer and basic web searching techniques that any journalist, researcher or donor could easily replicate, we attempted to see how many of the SPLC alleged groups could be located online, if they had physical addresses that could be identified, or any other information that would make their existence seem likely.

We do not claim that these results are absolute by any means. If any of our readers can provide corroborating information we will update our results immediately.

Better still, since the SPLC is known to monitor this blog, perhaps they would be willing to share their information about these alleged groups with us and the donors.

Big claims demand big proof, or any proof, for that matter.

We have color coded our results to highlight important aspects of the claims. Those highlighted in red appear to be defunct, based on news reports or results from the Intern Archives amazing Wayback Machine that indicate a website has been offline for months or more.

Those groups highlighted in blue are new to the “Hate Map” tool, or were at least not present on the 2017 map.

Those highlighted in yellow are the SPLC’s infamous “statewide” phantoms for which the company provides absolutely no documentation whatsoever, not even an alleged city or town. As such, these claims are meaningless and discarded from the get-go.

The SPLC lists 322 of its 1,020 alleged groups as “statewide” for 2018. The company added 107 brand new “statewide” phantoms in 2017 alone, and nobody in the Media called them out on it.

Let’s begin with those alleged groups for which no information could be found. If anyone has information on the location of these alleged groups, please contact us directly, especially the claimants from the SPLC.

WN-No Location-2018

The Shieldwall Network is a new addition to the “Hate Map,” which the SPLC attributes to the known neo-Nazi Billy Roper. According to their own estimates, they are a pretty sad “group” and not much of a threat.

The SPLC actually had a pretty good fix on the one-man “group” known as New Albion last year. After his election to the office of Town Manager for Jackman, Maine, (Population 900), Tom Kawczynski, made no secret of his white nationalist beliefs and his plans to establish a “new Albion” populated by whites only.

As the Daily Kos reported in January, 2018, the people of Jackman pitched in $30,000 out of their own pockets to pay off the racist and send him on his way. Kawcynski told the Daily Kos that he was packing up his one-man website and leaving town.

Jackman’s other “hate group,” the New Right also vanished from the Internet when Kawcynski left town, though nothing definite was found tying the two together.

Identity Evropa was the big winner in this category. In 2017, the SPLC claimed 15 chapters of this group, with four assigned to particular states and the other 11 being “statewide” phantoms. By 2018, the SPLC claimed that the group had more than doubled to 38 alleged chapters, half of which were “statewide,” as we will see below.

From what we can find, Identity Evropa’s main claim to fame is putting stickers on traffic signs and leaving flyers proclaiming “It’s okay to be white!” on college campuses. Other than several “bannering” events where a handful of people have gathered to unfurl banners from overpasses, usually decrying illegal immigration, most of their activity seems to occur late at night as the acts of individuals.

Again, we only have the SPLC’s word for it that these chapters actually exist, as no information for them in these particular states could be found online. Single individuals, just like one-man websites, are not “groups” and the physical threat of Identity Evropa has yet to be proven, especially by the SPLC.

Speaking of one-man websites, we next explore those alleged White Nationalist groups for which nothing more than a website and post office box or private mail box (PMB) from, say, the UPS Store or other mailing services, could be found.

For years, the SPLC denied tracking one-man websites on its annual “Hate Map,” using the boilerplate disclaimer that: “Websites appearing to be merely the work of a single individual, rather than the publication of a group, are not included in this list. “

The 2017 “Hate Map” included this disclaimer, which was subsequently dropped for the most recent, 2018 map:“Entities that appear to exist only in cyberspace are not included because they are likely to be individual Web publishers who likely to falsely portray themselves as powerful, organized froups [sic].”

Also in 2017, long-time SPLC frontman Mark Potok was claiming that: “We make a big effort to separate a man, his dog and a computer from a group with on-the-ground activity.” (Ironically, that same year Mr. Potok, quoted in Esquire magazine, described the neo-Nazi website, The Daily Stormer, as “mostly Andrew Angelin, his dog, and a computer.”

Potok claimed 32 chapters of The Daily Stormer website for 2017 (one in Ohio and 31 “statewide” phantoms) and 21 for 2018, all of which are “statewide.”

On February 21, 2019, SPLC “Outreach Manager” Kate Chance told a crowd of 300 in Mankato, MN, that: “An online presence isn’t enough to be added to the list; a group has to meet at least once a year at a physical location.”

WN-Website 1-2018

WN-Website 2-2018

We counted six alleged “groups” that had physical addresses that could be verified by Google Maps street view tool, but several turned out to be private residences or online vendors.

Patriotic Flags of Summerville, SC, an online vendor, has been on the “Hate Map” for ten years now. While they do offer Confederate battle flags, they also offer historic Confederate state flags, numerous iterations of the US flag with varying numbers of stars, flags of every nation on Earth, including all of Africa, Asia and Israel, “Peace” flags, as well as a number of LGBT “rainbow” flags. Not your typical “white nationalist” fare.

Radix Journal is the blog for the National Policy Institute website, but the SPLC counts them as two separate “groups.”

The H.L. Mencken Club is primarily a website, though they do offer annual conferences, with registration fees starting at $250.

The Fitzgerald Griffin Foundation is another website that offers the occasional get-together. In February, 2019, they invited members to join them for an evening of Viennese waltzing at the Organization of American States embassy in Washington, DC.

The FGF event previous to the Grand Ball was an 80th birthday tribute to publisher Jon Utley in 2014 and a PowerPoint presentation from 2011. This spotty social calendar would seem to fall short of Kate Chance’s claim that “groups” needed to meet at least once a year.

Red Ice Radio, as the name implies, is an online radio station based in Sweden. Its Internet ISP provider is listed as Magill University, in Montreal, Canada. The physical street address given is for a UPS Store in Harrisonburg, VA. Does it seem right that Harrisonburg should be tarred with a “hate group” for a private mail box to a Swedish website?

Website Right Stuff 1

The Right Stuff is the big winner of the website category, growing from 21 alleged chapters with ten “statewide” for 2017, to 34 alleged chapters with 14 “statewide” for 2018. Even the SPLC describes TRS as a blog, but that doesn’t stop them from counting it 34 times.

It’s worth noting that ten TRS chapters are making their “Hate Map” debut this year, with eight others that were listed in 2017 having vanished altogether.

This takes us through 91 of the SPLC’s 148 alleged White Nationalist “hate groups,” and we don’t have a lot to show for it. Let’s wind this up with a peek at the SPLC’s “statewide” phantoms for this category, for which they provide no proof whatsoever.

WN-Statewide-1-2018

As mentioned previously, many of Identity Evropa’s alleged chapters are “statewide,” including many that are making their debut. (Editor’s note: The Washington DC chapter should have been included in the previous IE graphic and not this one. Our apologies.)

WN-Statewide-Evropa-2018

Also mentioned were The Right Stuff’s phantoms, including many new chapters claimed by the SPLC.

WN-Statewide-Right Stuff-2018

The Patriot Front grew from four alleged chapters in 2017, with one assigned to Chicago and the other three “statewide” phantoms, to 15 alleged chapters for 2018, all 15 of which are “statewide.”

The SPLC appears to be losing its “hate groups” faster than it can create them.

WN-Statewide-Patriot-2018

And there we have it. Of the 148 White Nationalist groups claimed by the SPLC for 2018 a full 57 of the alleged groups, or 39% of the total, are “statewide” phantoms, up from 35% in 2017. Another 41% appear to be mainly websites, with little, if any, on-the-ground activity.

Using the same tools available to journalists and donors, we could not find any verifiable evidence for the remaining 20%.

Again, we don’t claim that because we could not find a group that it did not exist, but it is not up to us, to journalists or to donors to prove the SPLC’s claims. It falls squarely to the Southern Poverty Law Center to show their work, to document their claims where everyone can see their proof.

With the hundreds of millions of donor-dollars the SPLC took in over the past two years alone, based largely on their “hate group” claims, we do not feel that this is too much to ask.

Trust, but verify.

 

SPLC — North Carolina’s “Hate Groups” 2018

August 24, 2019

As part of our continuing series investigating the Southern Poverty Law Center’s “hate group” claims on a state-by-state basis, we will be having a look at the Tar Heel State of North Carolina.

As our decade-long research on the SPLC’s “hate group” methodology indicates, there is plenty of tar, and no shortage of feathers, to go around.

Our choice of North Carolina for the next installment in the series was prompted by a news story about an official proclamation passed by the Boone Town Council on August 15 of this year.  Mixed in among the 14 “Whereas’s” and pithy quotes by Einstein, Emerson and Plato, is the oft-repeated, seldom investigated, claim by the SPLC of 1,020 “hate groups” in the US for 2018.

We broke our results into three separate categories – those with confirmed physical addresses or no confirmed information whatsoever, those appearing to be online entities only (websites, blogs or vendors) and those that the SPLC has designated as “statewide.”

Before we begin, here are a few important points that need to be mentioned:

  • There is no legal or universal definition for “hate group”
  • The SPLC is the sole arbitrator of the lucrative “hate group” label, based on its own intentionally broad definition: “All hate groups attack or malign other groups.”
  • Post Office boxes or Private Mail Boxes (PMBs) are not “hate groups”
  • Web entities are not “hate groups,” even by the SPLC’s own definitions.
  • The SPLC’s “statewide” designation is meaningless, as it provides no verifiable information whatsoever that a donor or journalist could use to verify the claim. The term is therefore meaningless and all “statewide” groups are considered to be null and void. Fully 322 of the 1,020 alleged groups designated by the SPLC for 2018 are “statewide” phantoms, or one-in-three. The SPLC added 107 “statewide” groups in 2017 alone.
  • Watching the Watchdogs reviewed this list using basic web-searching techniques available to all journalists, researchers and donors. We do not imply that the results are in any way flawless, nor does this review imply advocacy or promotion of the beliefs or doctrines of any of the groups listed.
  • We welcome all corrections, comments or other verifiable information. We would especially appreciate hearing directly from the SPLC itself, as they are known to monitor this blog.

With that out of the way, onward to North Carolina!

Of the 40 alleged “hate groups” assigned to North Carolina by the SPLC for 2018, we were able to find physical addresses for 11 of them, using basic web searching techniques and verifying the results using Google Maps’ street view app.

We do not claim that this methodology is fool-proof, or necessarily the final word on the subject. It is not up to us or anyone other than the SPLC to prove that the groups they claim in their fundraising materials actually exist.

Since we know the SPLC monitors this blog, we invite and encourage them to contact us and show their work. If they have the proof in hand, how hard can it be to show it?

NC Address

North Carolina – 2018

Keen-eyed readers may notice that all 11 groups listed fall under the SPLC’s “Black Nationalist” category. In all, 19 of the 40 groups assigned to North Carolina last year are black, or nearly half the alleged total.

According to the SPLC, North Carolina’s 19 alleged Black “hate groups” outnumber all of the state’s alleged Ku Klux Klan, Neo-Confederate, Neo-Nazi, Racist Skinhead and White Nationalist groups COMBINED, and 13 out of 14 of the latter are “statewide” phantoms (versus only one alleged Black group).

As we have noted on numerous other postings, the SPLC claims that Black Nationalist groups are the largest and fastest growing category of “hate group” on its nationwide  “Hate Map” fundraising tool.

According to the SPLC, Black “hate groups” outnumber ALL of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Confederate, neo-Nazi and Racist Skinhead “groups” on the “Hate Map” COMBINED, at 264 versus 262. Strip out the “statewide” phantoms and Black “hate groups” outnumber the other four categories combined BY THREE TO ONE, at 252 versus 82.

It turns out that 13 of North Carolina’s alleged Black “hate groups” are Black Hebrew or Black Israelite groups, whose main claim to infamy, according to the SPLC, is that they have the hate-filled audacity to “assert that black people are the biblical “chosen people” of God.”

Despite the evidence of their own numbers, the SPLC continues to claim that white “hate groups” are on the rise, a claim parroted by the Media and ultimately found in the recent Boone proclamation.

NC Website

North Carolina 2018

Next up, we have 12 groups for which no physical address could be found, or only a website or Facebook page was located. Granted, just because we were unable to find any information on these alleged groups it in no way proves that they do note exist. That being said, it’s not up to us to prove a negative.

If the SPLC has the evidence, make them produce it.

To that end, while we were not able to find a physical address for the Loyal White Knights of the KKK, we did find a recent video interview by the Charlotte Observer with three people who claim to belong to the group.

“BeaSSt Productions” would seem to be an online vendor of neo-Nazi music, but no sign of them could be found online today. Our review of other state “hate group” claims have found several cases where the accused has either moved to another state or has vanished from the Internet entirely.

With more than 300 full time employees on the payroll, nobody at the SPLC appears to have been tasked with checking on these older claims. But really, why would they? It’s not as if anyone in the Media is going to call them on it.

Last, and by all means least, we have those infamous groups for which the SPLC can provide no documentation whatsoever. Instead, the company buries them under the categorical slush fund known as “statewide.”

NC Statewide

North Carolina 2018

Since the SPLC couldn’t bother to allege a known city or town for these groups, they can be discarded out of hand. Big claims demand big proof, or any proof, for that matter.

Just for laughs, since nearly half of the alleged groups the SPLC assigned to North Carolina last year are homeless phantoms, it might be instructive to see how some of those “statewide” groups stack up nationwide.

Statewide 2018

SPLC “Statewide” groups -2018

As it turns out, 169 of the 210 alleged “hate groups” listed above are “statewide,” or 80% of the total. There are still more than 100 others on the nationwide list, but we thought it would be instructive to show in just how many cases all, or nearly all, of the alleged “groups” turn out to be unverifiable, homeless ghosts.

So there you have it. Of the 40 alleged “hate groups” assigned to North Carolina by the SPLC last year, only 11 have verifiable, physical addresses, and all of those are black “hate groups.”

In the final analysis, fully 90% of North Carolina’s alleged “hate groups” are either Black or invisible, and at least two, if not three, of the four groups remaining are websites.

The Town of Boone’s official proclamation, which cites the SPLC’s spurious claims and bemoans an alleged “rise in white nationalism” is little more than self-serving virtue signaling.

Ironically, it seems that Boone’s demographics are 94% white and less than 4% Black. Only one member of the town council is non-white.

North Carolina is only 68% white. Maybe the town council should look into its own issues of “white supremacy” and see what it can do to bring Boone out of 1919 into 2019.

That’s what the SPLC would want them to do.

—————————————————————————————————-

Considering the Southern Poverty Law Center took in over $111 million donor-dollars in 2018 and $130 million more, based largely on these flimsy claims, some of you readers might consider reporting this to your state attorneys general as potential consumer fraud.

Watching the Watchdogs will be happy to provide any additional information upon request.

SPLC — New England’s “Hate Groups” 2018

August 18, 2019

Recently we posted a review of the alleged “hate groups” the Southern Poverty Law Center had assigned to the Commonwealth of Virginia for 2018. We broke our results into three separate categories – those with confirmed physical addresses or no confirmed information whatsoever, those appearing to be online entities only (websites, blogs or vendors) and those that the SPLC has designated as “statewide.”

That review began with a lengthy, but necessary, preamble, which we will condense here:

  • There is no legal or universal definition for “hate group”
  • The SPLC is the sole arbitrator of the lucrative “hate group” label, based on its own intentionally broad definition: “All hate groups attack or malign other groups.”
  • Post Office boxes or Private Mail Boxes (PMBs) are not “hate groups”
  • Web entities are not “hate groups,” even by the SPLC’s own definitions.
  • The SPLC’s “statewide” designation is meaningless, as it provides no verifiable information whatsoever that a donor or journalist could use to verify the claim. The term is therefore meaningless and all “statewide” groups are considered to be null and void. Fully 322 of the 1,020 alleged groups designated by the SPLC for 2018 are “statewide” phantoms, or one-in-three. The SPLC added 107 “statewide” groups in 2017 alone.
  • Watching the Watchdogs reviewed this list using basic web-searching techniques available to all journalists, researchers and donors. We do not imply that the results are in any way flawless, nor does this review imply advocacy or promotion of the beliefs or doctrines of any of the groups listed.
  • We welcome all corrections, comments or other verifiable information. We would especially appreciate hearing directly from the SPLC itself, as they are known to monitor this blog.

And with the formalities out of the way… on with the show.

We chose New England for the second review because it covers six states together, many of which are home to thousands of Progressive SPLC donors. It is our hope that this information will help to illustrate just how spurious the SPLC’s “hate group” claims are.

For starters, 19 of New England’s 35 alleged groups are “statewide” phantoms, or 54% of the total, right off the top.

Connecticut 2018

Connecticut – 2018

Four of the six alleged groups the SPLC assigned to Connecticut this year are “statewide” phantoms. All Eyes on Egipt [sic] is part of a chain of black-owned bookstores.

ACT for America is an online advocacy group that no longer identifies local chapters, though some maintain individual Facebook pages, with no physical locations provided. ACT requires new members to register as individual activists only. The SPLC claims 47 ACT chapters across the country, but provides no physical address information.

Maine 2018

Maine – 2018

Two of Maine’s alleged groups are “statewide” phantoms, and while there is a Facebook page for a Maine chapter of ACT, there was no information connecting it to the town of Norway.

A bizarre situation played out in the tiny town of Jackman, Maine, (population 900) last year. The Jackman Town Manager, Tom Kawczynski, made no secret of his white nationalist beliefs (after he was elected to office) and promoted an all-white utopia he called “New Albion.”

As the Daily Kos reported in January, 2018, the people of Jackman pitched in $30,000 out of their own pockets to pay off the racist and send him on his way. Kawcynski told the Daily Kos that he was packing up his one-man website and leaving town.

Even though this “group,” and presumably the “National Right,” also allegedly of Jackman, (one wonders who was behind that site?), have vanished from the Internet, the SPLC keeps them on the 2018 “Hate Map” because all fundraising materials for 2019 are based on a fixed number of 1,020 “hate groups,” and removing any for any reason would smack of fallibility.

Mass 2018

Massachusetts – 2018

Four out of eleven of the Bay State’s alleged groups are “statewide” phantoms. Three of four of its alleged Black Nationalist groups have physical addresses that can be verified on Google Maps. The remainder appear to be websites only.

As we noted on the Virginia groups posting, the SPLC claims that Black Nationalist groups are the largest and fastest growing category of “hate group” on its “Hate Map” fundraising tool.

The SPLC’s Black Nationalist groups fall into three broad segments: Militant groups, such as the New Black Panther Party and its clones. Some 76 Nation of Islam mosques, which are not labeled as “Muslim hate groups,” as they would challenge the existential threat from the SPLC’s 100 highly lucrative “anti-Muslim hate groups,” of which nearly half are ACT for America Facebook pages.

At least another 120 groups are Black Hebrews, whose main claim to “hate” comes from the fact that have the audacity to “assert that black people are the biblical “chosen people” of God.”

According to the SPLC, Black “hate groups” outnumber ALL of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Confederate, neo-Nazi and Racist Skinhead “groups” on the “Hate Map” COMBINED, at 264 versus 262. Strip out the “statewide” phantoms and Black “hate groups” outnumber the other four categories combined BY THREE TO ONE, at 252 versus 82.

Remember the narrative, folks: “White hate groups are on the rise!”

New Hampshire 2018

New Hampshire – 2018

New Hampshire presents an interesting case as six of ten of its alleged groups are “statewide.” ACT for America maintains a Facebook page for Hollis, NH, which is right next-door to Nashua, and, oddly enough, the Hopkinton Facebook chapter is out of Hopkinton, Massachusetts… oops!

The Slaves of the Immaculate Heart of Mary are a Catholic organization located in the woods of tiny Richmond, NH, (population 1,155). The group has been disavowed by the Catholic Church proper, all the way up to the Pope.

IHS Media is the online bookstore for the Slaves, located in the same building, but the SPLC likes to count some groups twice.

Rhode Island - Vermont 2018

Rhode Island – Vermont – 2018

Since all three of the alleged groups assigned to Rhode Island and Vermont are homeless phantoms, we’ll just combine the two states and ignore all of the claims at the same time.

Just for laughs, since more than half of the alleged groups the SPLC assigned to New England last year are homeless phantoms, it might be instructive to see how some of the Northeast’s “statewide” groups stack up nationwide.

Statewide 2018

SPLC “Statewide” groups -2018

As it turns out, 169 of the 210 alleged “hate groups” listed above are “statewide,” or 80% of the total. There are still more than 100 others on the nationwide list, but we thought it would be instructive to show in just how many cases all, or nearly all, of the alleged “groups” turn out to be unverifiable, homeless ghosts.

So there you have it. Of the 35 alleged groups the SPLC assigned to the six New England states only a handful have verifiable, physical addresses, and nearly all of those are black “hate groups.” The rest seem to exist only in cyberspace, and more than half exist only in the imaginations and fundraising propaganda of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Considering the company took in over $111 million donor-dollars in2018 and $130 million more, based largely on these flimsy claims, some of you readers might consider reporting this to your state attorneys general as potential consumer fraud.

Watching the Watchdogs will be happy to provide any additional information upon request.

SPLC — Virginia’s “Hate Groups” 2018

August 16, 2019

Every so often, it is useful to take a closer look at the “hate group” claims made by the Southern Poverty Law Center. In the first of a series of such claims directed at various states, we have examined the “hate groups” the SPLC has assigned to the Commonwealth of Virginia.

First, a little background information:

  1. There is no legal definition for “hate group.” As abhorrent as most people would find the words and deeds of many of these groups, it is important to remember that it is entirely legal to belong to any of them. This is why the FBI and local law enforcement cannot act against them until they actually break the law, or appear to be on the verge of doing so.This observation is not to be interpreted as any kind of endorsement for any group, but a reminder that as soon as individuals decide that “it’s okay to punch a Nazi,” it is only a matter of time before it’s okay to punch someone who “looks like a Nazi,” or “sounds like a Nazi,” or drives a Volkswagen, etc.Sooner or later, someone will decide that YOU must be a Nazi.Until just recently, the SPLC’s “Hate Map” tool always included the boilerplate disclaimer that:

    Listing here does not imply a group advocates or engages in violence or other criminal activity.”

    That disclaimer went away a couple years ago, leaving the donors to come to their own conclusions. Another SPLC claim that was attached to every new “Hate Map” until recently read:

    Hate group activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing.”

    The very idea that an organization purporting to defend civil rights would deliberately conflate six of the most fundamental, constitutionally protected First Amendment rights with “criminal acts” and “hate group activities” is beyond comprehension.

  2. The SPLC’s definition of a “hate group” is intentionally broad, so that the company can apply it as widely as possible, as we will shortly see:“All hate groups have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”“Attack or malign” is too imprecise to be useful, and, as we have pointed out repeatedly in the past, is all too often applied selectively by the SPLC, so as not to offend the almighty donors.Due to the lack of an official or universal definition for “hate group,” the media and donors rely on the SPLC’s claims, thereby making the company the sole arbiter of that extremely lucrative label ($111 million donor-dollars in 2018, $130 million in 2017, way up from a mere $50 million for 2016). 
  3. The SPLC’s definition of “group” is criminally broad to the point of outright fraud. The company has no benchmark for determining how many people actually constitute a “group,” and makes no verifiable estimates of how many members a “group” might actually have.Laird Wilcox, one of the most respected researchers on the Hate Industry, noted nearly 20 years ago:“What [the SPLC] apparently did was list any group they could find mention of, including groups only rumored to exist. These included the large number of “post office box chapters” maintained by Klan and skinhead organizations. Some Christian Identity “ministries” consist only one person and a mailing list and many “patriot groups” consist of but three or four friends.”More recently, in 2015, Mark Pitcavage of the Anti-Defamation League repeated Wilcox’s findings in the South Jersey Times:“According to Mark Pitcavage, director of investigative research at the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) the SPLC has a habit of counting single individuals as groups or chapters, which can give a skewed impression of hate groups in any given state.”

    “The [SPLC’s] list is wildly inflated,” said Pitcavage. “They list skinhead groups in places where there are no organized groups, but instead it’s just a couple of individuals.”

     

  4. In addition to numerous PO box “groups,” the SPLC’s “Hate Map” is loaded with one-man websites, something the company has denied counting for years:”Websites appearing to be merely the work of a single individual, rather than the publication of a group, are not included in this list. “The 2017 “Hate Map” included this disclaimer, which was subsequently dropped for the most recent, 2018 map:“Entities that appear to exist only in cyberspace are not included because they are likely to be individual Web publishers who likely to falsely portray themselves as powerful, organized froups [sic].”Also in 2017, long-time SPLC frontman Mark Potok was claiming that: “We make a big effort to separate a man, his dog and a computer from a group with on-the-ground activity.”

    In February, 2019, the SPLC’s new outreach director, Kate Chance, told a gathering in Mankato, Minnesota: “An online presence isn’t enough to be added to the list; a group has to meet at least once a year at a physical location.”

    As we shall see in our examination of Virginia’s SPLC-designated “hate groups” below, these claims are patently and demonstrably false.

The Southern Poverty Law Center assigned 39 “hate groups” to Virginia for 2018. Using basic Internet search skills that any journalist or donor could easily duplicate, we searched for information on each group.

While thorough, we do not in any way claim that these searches are infallible or that other information may not be available elsewhere. If any readers have verifiable information on any of these groups, please contact us through the Comments section at the end of this post.

Better still, since the SPLC is known to monitor this blog, perhaps they would be willing to show their work and share their information with the world and their donors.

Big claims, after all, demand big proof, or any proof, for that matter.

To simplify our results, we broke our findings into three basic sections. The first consists of alleged “groups” where either a physical address could be identified, or those where no information could be found whatsoever.

The second section identifies “groups” that appear to exist only as websites. The last section contains alleged “groups” that the SPLC has designated only as “statewide,” a dubious device that we will explore further in detail.

VaGroups2018-3

Group One

As our Group One results indicate, we were only able to identify five alleged groups with verifiable physical addresses. Using Google Maps street view tool, we were able to identify brick-and-mortar locations with appropriate signage.

Using this tool, we were able to eliminate several other groups listing physical addresses on their websites when those addresses turned out to be private mail forwarding services, such as the UPS Store.

It’s worth noting that the advocacy group, ProEnglish, has been residing in Washington, DC, since at least 2017, according to the Internet Archive’s amazing Wayback Machine, and should not be on Virginia’s list to begin with.

In fact, whether or not you agree with ProEnglish’s stated mission to make English the official language of all federal and state governments, the argument is a legitimate political position, which in no way “attacks or maligns” anyone. Calling the organization a “hate group” because you disagree with the position is disingenuous at best, especially since the vast majority of the world’s nations have one or more official languages.

Three of Virginia’s alleged Black Nationalist groups had verifiable addresses as well. The rhetoric of the Nation of Islam’s leadership clearly falls within most people’s definition of anti-Semitism.

Seventy-six of the 264 Black Nationalist groups the SPLC designated nationwide last year are Nation of Islam mosques, but surprisingly, the company does not consider them to be “Muslim hate groups,” as that would clash with their more lucrative “anti-Muslim hate group” category.

The largest single alleged anti-Muslim group on the map is ACT for America, at 47 iterations, but the national website no longer tracks local units and all new members must sign on as individual activists. If the SPLC can show proof of the locations of any of their ACT groups we’d be very interested in seeing it.

It’s also noteworthy that Virginia’s remaining Black Nationalist “groups” are Black Israelite churches, who are “hateful” because, as the SPLC notes, “Some religious versions assert that black people are the biblical “chosen people” of God.”

Think about that for a moment.

VaGroups2018-Full

Group Two

Group Two of our results are those for which nothing could be found beyond a website and Post Office or Private Mail Box (PMB). While people may gain access to these “groups” through their websites or snail mail, there was nothing on any of the sites to indicate any extensive jackboots-on-the-ground, with one glaring exception.

The Fitzgerald Griffin Foundation (FGF), whose mission since 2003 has been “…to promote and preserve the glorious traditions and culture of Western civilization and Christianity,” invited its members to join them this past February for a magnificent “Evening of Viennese Waltzing” in DC.

Waltzing

If Western Civilization and Christianity were not enough to trigger SPLC donors, a night of waltzing would be money in the bank.

The event previous to the Grand Ball was an 80th birthday tribute to publisher Jon Utley in 2014 and a PowerPoint presentation from 2011.

VDARE and American Renaissance are both online blogs. Washington Summit Publishers, IHS Press and even FGF are online booksellers. In the Spirit of Chartres Committee, “Dedicated to promoting and defending Pre-Vatican II Catholic social teachings…,” offers books like Ethics and the National Economy and Catholicism, Protestantism, and Capitalism, as well as DVDs of lectures recorded in the early 2000s.

The American Immigration Control Foundation is located in picturesque Monterey, Virginia (population 156), which is also home to one of the best maple syrup festivals this side of northern New England. There is more of hotcakes than “hotbeds” in that part of the world.

Red Ice, as its website explains, “delivers videos” and offers “an alternative to the mainstream, covering politics and social issues from a pro-European perspective.” Based in Sweden, they recently announced a presence in Harrisonburg, Va, but the address given is for a UPS Store in a strip mall, and their website ISP is registered in Montreal, Canada.

Harrisonburg is a college town and the local colleges and universities compete nationwide for the best students. Does the town really deserve to be tarnished with a “hate group” over a private mail box for a foreign website?

In all, 15 of Virginia’s alleged “hate groups” appear to exist only as online entities. We won’t pretend that some, perhaps many, will find their content to be offensive, but it is still protected speech and do one or two social Neanderthals running a website really constitute a “group”?

Is it really “attacking and maligning” when you have to physically search these “groups” out in order to be properly outraged?

Perhaps the biggest question would be how many people would ever have heard of these “groups” without the free worldwide publicity generated by the SPLC?

VaGroups2018-Statewide

Group Three

Our last section deals with those alleged “hate groups” the SPLC has merely designated as “statewide,” without even going through the motions of making up an alleged city or town.

As many Watching the Watchdogs readers are painfully aware, our primary focus is to get out the word that the SPLC’s “statewide” designation is worthless for verifying any claims about these groups. As the data provided above demonstrates, even the inclusion of a known location is no guarantee that a “group” actually exists there.

Imagine telling someone that your organization had identified hundreds of active UFO bases across this great land of ours.

“Great Scott!,” they might exclaim. “Where are they?”

“We found 17 in Georgia, 23 in Wisconsin, four more in Rhode Island…”

“This is incredible news! You have to take us there!”

“Um, well, we don’t actually know WHERE the sites are, but we sure as heck know that they are really out there. Trust us!”

People would throw rocks at you, and rightly so. Tell the same folks that you found hundreds of invisible “hate groups,” with no verifiable proof whatsoever, though, and they will throw millions of donor-dollars at you instead.

Incredible news, indeed. Literally.

Nationwide, fully 322 of the 1,020 “hate groups” designated by the SPLC for 2018 are “statewide” phantoms. That works out to one-in-three, just as it does with Virginia’s alleged count. In many states, 80-, 90- and even a full 100% of the groups designated are homeless “statewide” phantoms.

The SPLC padded its “Hate Map” with 107 brand new “statewide” phantoms in 2017 alone. And nobody in the Media said a word.

Just for fun, check out how some of Virginia’s invisible “groups” fare across the country:

VaGroups2018-Statewide-Nationwide

Nationwide “Statewide Groups”

In all, 153 of 194 alleged “groups” turn out to be “statewide” across the country, or, once again, roughly one-in-three. Do you see a pattern here?

We found this exercise to be illuminating and we hope you did as well. As mentioned, we plan on examining the “hate groups” designated to several other states, though we will skip the lengthy preamble next time and get right to the meat.

It is our intention to pass this information along to the Attorney General of Virginia’s consumer fraud division. Considering the hundreds of millions of dollars the Southern Poverty Law Center takes in from peddling these faulty figures, the matter deserves to be brought to the attention of the proper legal authorities.

Maybe that will induce the SPLC to show its work. If they have the proof in hand already, how hard can it be?

 

SPLC — The Real Threat from “Domestic Terrorists”

August 9, 2019

In the aftermath of the recent mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, the Southern Poverty Law Center has been garnering a lot of media attention. While there is nothing unusual about an “advocacy group” with hundreds of millions of dollars of cash on hand and a huge publicity staff attracting attention, this time the stakes are higher.

In the old days, whenever a mentally disturbed individual shot up the place, the SPLC would do everything it its power to attempt to tie the perpetrator to a known “hate group,” with varying success. Failing that, the company’s Intelligence Director, Mark Potok, would eventually concede that the shooter was probably a lone-wolf lunatic.

“And I would say as a general matter, it is extremely unusual these days for an organization to plan and carry out a criminal act where mainly for the reason that they are so likely to get caught.

So what we really see out there in terms of violence from the radical right is by and large what we would call lone wolves, people operating on their own or with just one or two partners. As opposed to, you know, being some kind of organizational plan.” (www.npr.org, October 30, 2008) [Emphasis added]

And:

“Still, [Potok] said the public should remain vigilant about the activities of hate groups, even though individuals are responsible for the majority of hate crimes in America. (www.courier-journal.com, July 21, 2009) [Emphasis added]

The problem with the “lone wolf” scenario is that there really wasn’t any good way to make money from it. While the SPLC rakes in hundreds of millions of donor-dollars a year by selling dire warnings of hundreds of “hate groups” it is allegedly “tracking,” lone wolves don’t usually appear on the radar until after they have struck.

When Jared Loughner shot 20 people in Tuscon, Arizona, in 2011,  including US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, the SPLC’s Intelligence Director, Mark Potok, tried to tie Loughner to the militia movement by analyzing a list of his favorite books. Among the right-wing screeds listed were “Peter Pan,” “The Odyssey,” ‘Aesop’s Fables,” “The Phantom Tollbooth,” “The Communist Manifesto,” “Mein Kampf,” “Gulliver’s Travels” and “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

Despite a valiant effort, once Loughner’s Uncle Fester-esque mug shot was published, even Mr. Potok had to write him off as a likely lunatic, acting alone.

Jared

Jared Loughner

That was then. Flash forward to 2019 and the “Lone Wolf” has suddenly morphed into the “Domestic Terrorist.” As we first warned in 2012, when the SPLC was first playing with the “Domestic Terrorist” tag, there are some very serious civil liberty issues that come into play now.

Whereas the FBI and local law enforcement can do little against so-called “hate groups” until they actually break a law or pose a reasonable threat to public safety (beyond “wrong thoughts”), alleged “terrorists” do not enjoy such Constitutional niceties. Law Enforcement agencies, from the DHS down to the local police, can detain alleged “terror” suspects with far less due process.

With a “shoot first, ask questions later” mentality prevailing, every law-abiding citizen would be under the threat of detention, or at the very least of harassment, from law enforcement officials who are obligated to investigate every charge of alleged terrorism.

This is no longer simply a matter of the Southern Poverty Law Center scaring blue-haired Progressives out of donor-dollars. Everyone’s civil rights are now under threat.

We saw the devastating loss of Constitutionally protected civil rights after Congress rammed through the USA PATRIOT ACT in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks in 2001. The SPLC’s “Domestic Terrorist” slur threatens to be every bit as dangerous.

SPLC — Putting the Hype in Hypocrisy

June 19, 2019

In recent days the Internet has been buzzing breathlessly with the news that rapper 21 Savage cut a check for $25,000 to the Southern Poverty Law Center in appreciation for its work to get him released from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention in February.

The rapper, whose real name is She’yaa Bin Abraham-Joseph, was brought to the US legally in 2005 by his British parents, who, like millions of other illegal immigrants, simply overstayed their visas. Abraham-Joseph was picked up while driving in Atlanta on February 3.

The SPLC and several other organizations lost little time jumping on the bandwagon to free the famed rapper. Free publicity such as this is just too good to pass up. Apparently, their efforts paid off and 21 Savage was released from detention and, to show his gratitude, wrote a check for $25 grand to the SPLC and the hype machinery ground into full gear.

According to its most recent online tax forms, the SPLC took in $110 million dollars in 2018, on top of $130 million in 2017. The company’s assets now exceed half a billion dollars.

The SPLC takes in $301,000 in donations a day, or $25,000 every two hours, all day, every day of the year.

According to one source, 21 Savage is worth at least $8 million. His check for $25,000 represents .3% of his fortune and a micro-fraction of what he would have paid an immigration lawyer.

To put it into perspective, the US Median Household Income for 2018 was $61,372. Three-tenths of one percent of that figure comes to $184.11. Big deal.

The money means nothing to either party, but that didn’t stop the SPLC from making claims that the pittance will somehow “provide vital resources for detained immigrants.”

21 Savage

“Vital resources” for a company with $500 million in cash on hand.

Even more ironic, (a term that is synonymous with SPLC), is the fact that the Law Center recently cooked up a new category of “hate group” product with which to terrorize and outrage its Progressive donor base: Male Supremacy.

“Male supremacy is a hateful ideology advocating for the subjugation of women,” according to the SPLC.

“Male supremacy misrepresents all women as genetically inferior, manipulative and stupid and reduces them to their reproductive or sexual function — with sex being something that they owe men and that can or even should be coerced out of them. Driven by a biological analysis of women as fundamentally inferior to men, male supremacists malign women specifically for their gender.”

Sounds nasty, no? As it turns out, even a casual review of 21 Savage’s rap lyrics reveals dozens of “songs” that denigrate women as “bitches” and “hoes,” describe the joys of feeding said bitches date rape drugs and giving them the slapping around they richly deserve. (We soon lost count of the number of references to “n*gg*s, drugs and murder lacing the artist’s creations.)

No male supremacy there. The SPLC scooped up the misogynist’s check and even posed for propaganda photos with it. No hypocrisy there.

But then again, this is the same “civil rights advocacy” company that makes money on the sale of every copy of the “I am So Sick of White Guys” coloring book. It says so right on the front cover.

Sick-of-White-Guys-book

“10% of all sales will be donated to the SPLC”

No hypocrisy there either.

 


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