Posts Tagged ‘Southern Poverty Law Center’

Lecia Brooks for President!

November 29, 2018

In his inaugural address in 1961, President John F. Kennedy spoke of a metaphorical torch being passed to a new generation and the benefits that such an infusion of new ideas and life experience would bring to the country. Sadly, JFK’s untimely murder in Dallas in 1963 cut short the promise, but not the premise, of such a bold proposal.

As the Southern Poverty Law Center draws ever closer to its fiftieth anniversary in 2021, and basks in the glory of its most profitable year to date (2017), we believe it is time for the company’s Old Guard to consider stepping aside to make room for its own “new generation.” To “go out at the top” of their game, as it were.

A recent article written in the Washington Post Magazine, by David Montgomery, noted that SPLC founder, Morris Dees, who is now 81 years old, “doesn’t come into the office regularly anymore…” Dees, who first became a millionaire in 1964 and lives in a 20-room mansion on a 300-acre compound with his fifth wife, still pays himself $358,000 donor-dollars a year.

It’s not as though a much-deserved retirement would leave Mr. Dees destitute. As his publicity agency notes, the “Legendary Civil Rights Activist” maintains a lucrative public speaking side-gig, charging between $10,000 and $20,000 a pop.

Dees Fees

One low-end speaking engagement a month, or even a high-end gig every other month, would certainly keep the wolves away from the doors of Casa Dees.

SPLC President, Richard Cohen, who presumably keeps the store open in the absence of Mr. Dees, turns 78 in a couple of months, has also had a very good run and is equally deserving of well-earned rest. Mr. Cohen has been making public speaking appearances more frequently in the past few years, and could certainly fall back on that in the unlikely event he has been frittering away his $350,000 donor-dollar annual paychecks.

The third, and by far the youngest member of the triumvirate of “old white guys” who have been running the SPLC for the past few decades, has already left the stage. Mark Potok, whose titles at the company have included Director of Intelligence and Senior Fellow, was the public face and voice of the Southern Poverty Law Center for twenty years, until he was quietly and unceremoniously pushed out in early 2017.

Mr. Potok has since embarked on his own public speaking and consulting career, though it’s doubtful his fees are making up for the $150,000-a-year he was making at the SPLC.

Potok was replaced as Director of Intelligence by Heidi Beirich, who also has a long career at the SPLC. Although Ms. Beirich holds a PhD and two Masters degrees, she doesn’t have the public presence of the Old Boys. Dr. Beirich’s voice doesn’t resonate indignation as well as her predecessor and she has been known to go off-script in public interviews. That being said, she excels at behind-the-scenes research and would continue to make money for the company in that regard.

This brings us to the most logical choice for a new president for the SPLC: Lecia Brooks.

lecia_brooks

Lecia Brooks

Lecia Brooks has been with the company since 2004 and has held two concurrent directorships at the SPLC for over a decade, a feat none of her colleagues can claim. Ms. Brooks is articulate, highly intelligent, and more importantly, Black, female and gay. She would bring a diverse world view and lived experience to the position far beyond anything Messrs. Dees and Cohen could conceive of.

In addition to her posts as Outreach Director and director of the SPLC’s Civil Rights Memorial Center, Ms. Brooks was once allowed to helm the company’s “Teaching Tolerance” unit, which purports to promote diversity in the K-12 classroom. After several months, Ms. Brooks was asked to yield the post to the highly-diverse, Maureen Costello.

Costello

Maureen Costello

Lecia Brooks’ lack of a law degree in no way diminishes her candidacy for SPLC president. As Morris Dees wrote in his 1991 autobiography, his choice of Civil Rights icon Julian Bond to be the company’s first president, had more to do with fundraising than hate-fighting.

“Before we could ask for money, we had to establish credibility. We needed a prominent figure whose presence would announce the center’s values and promise. Julian Bond seemed the perfect choice.”

“I had never met Julian Bond. My friend Chuck Morgan… working for the ACLU… arranged a meeting in Atlanta. When I told [Bond] about our hopes and plans, he agreed to serve as president of the Law Center, a largely honorary position.”

Not only did Bond lack a law degree, in 1971 he had only recently returned to college in Atlanta to resume his pursuit of a Bachelor’s degree in English, which had been long-delayed by his civil rights work during the 1960s.

In fact, Bond continued to live in Atlanta, some 200 miles from SPLC headquarters in Montgomery, throughout his “honorary” presidency. As the Julian Bond Papers collection at the University of Virginia indicate, all Bond had to do was sign the fundraising letters written in his name by Morris Dees. Documents in that collection refer to Mr. Bond’s monthly “fee,” rather than his “salary.”

Fast-forward 47 years and the SPLC finds itself in a very different financial situation. Not only was 2017 the company’s most profitable year to date, with receipts exceeding $136 million (compared to a meager $50 million for 2016), the SPLC’s cash-on-hand “Morris Dees Legacy Fund,” 98% of which is designated as “unrestricted” in use, bulged to more than $433 million.

As journalist Ken Silverstein noted in his November 2000 article for Harper’s magazine, The Church of Morris Dees, :

Back in 1978, when the Center had less than $10 million, Dees promised that his organization would quit fund-raising and live off interest as soon as its endowment hit $55 million. But as it approached that figure, the SPLC upped the bar to $100 million, a sum that, one 1989 newsletter promised, would allow the Center “to cease the costly and often unreliable task of fund raising. ”

The SPLC hit the $100 million mark in 2002, the $200 million mark in 2007 and the $300 million mark in 2010. Surely, with $433 million in cash in the bank, fundraising is the last thing President Brooks would need to worry about.

As we recently noted, the SPLC only spends an average of 4% of its annual budget on “legal case costs,” while spending up to 41% a year on fundraising. If you strip that 41% burden (as well as the very expensive supporting infrastructure) out of the annual operating budget, the SPLC could keep its doors  wide open for the next 17 years without asking for another dime.

Naturally, Progressives would continue to donate to the company, if for nothing more than the bumper stickers, coffee mugs and tote-bags that would allow them to signal their superior virtue, but President Brooks could focus her attention on the civil rights law, the “poverty law,” for which the SPLC was founded in the first place.

How about it, Mr. Dees? Mr. Cohen? Will you pass the torch to a new generation? To an eminently qualified candidate who not only shares your values and goals, but who also represents the very people you claim to serve?

You’ve done what you set out to do, gentlemen. Go out at the top.

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SPLC — Crunching the Numbers — 2018

August 29, 2018

Have you received a donation request from the Southern Poverty Law Center recently? Do you ever wonder how your donations are spent? Thanks to ProPublica, you can review the SPLC’s IRS Form 990 tax returns all the way back to 2001.

With the exception of 2009 and 2012, the company has always taken in significantly more money than was needed to keep the doors open. Some may recall that 2009 was the year after Bernie Madoff’s investment scam was exposed, costing investors and many nonprofit organizations billions of dollars in losses.

To date, there is no evidence that the SPLC was involved with Madoff. It seems that 2009 was simply a bad year all around.

Legal Case Costs 2000-2017

While the SPLC claims that “During the last fiscal year, approximately 68% of our total expenses were spent on program services,” a closer look at the numbers raises some questions to the accuracy of that statement.

One of the biggest red flags is the annual fundraising costs. Each year the SPLC declares a sum directly spent on fundraising outright for the year, $12,626,830 for 2017, as well as a sum spent on “joint costs.” These came to $12,147,345 last year.

The SPLC’s auditor describes “joint costs” as “Activities and the production of materials which combine development, education, and management functions are allocated to the program and supporting services on the basis of the content of the material, the reason for its distribution, and the audience to whom it is delivered.”

In short, “joint costs” are fundraising costs (“development”) attributed to other departments. As the auditor notes: “The Center incurred joint costs of $12,147,345 for educational materials and activities as part of fund-raising appeals during the year ended October 31, 2017.”

For example, SPLC “Management” spent $1,022,000 on postage last year. Since the business of management is arguably to “manage” the company’s 302 employees, that works out nine pieces of first class mail to every employee every single day of FY 2017.

As the graphic above indicates, the SPLC spent 41% of its budget on outright fundraising and “joint costs” last year.

While joint costs accounting is not illegal, and is practiced by many of the largest nonprofits and charities in the country, it is ethically ambiguous, according to Charity Navigator, one of the leading industry watchdogs:

“Although the use of this accounting “trick” is often perfectly in line with the accounting rules for the reporting of joint solicitation costs (AICPA SOP 98-2) these rules allow for many interpretations and judgments that can produce questionable results.”

The graphic also indicates that the Southern Poverty Law Center has never spent more than 6% of its budget on legal case costs this century (and only in one single year, at that), something that the average donor might find surprising, and possibly quite alarming.

After all, shouldn’t the main business of a law center be the practice of actual poverty law?

Mark Potok, the SPLC’s Intelligence Director for 20 years, explained this confusing situation several years ago:

In the 70’s … “poverty law” was actually the phrase … it was a phrase used that just applied to … essentially … civil rights law … to kind of human rights legal actions. I know a couple years ago there was a big discussion internally [at the SPLC], ‘Should we change our name to something else?’

People think, you know, that it’s all about, sort of, defending poor people, and that’s not really, exactly what our mission is. By that time, people knew the name so well that, you know, we made, I think, the obviously right decision not to change the name (Holiday, Track 1).

While the SPLC never did change its name, it did change its mission. In 2014, the company quietly removed the “non-profit civil rights organization” descriptor from its website, press releases and other fundraising materials,  replacing it with “civil rights advocacy group.”

While the two phrases sound similar, they are in no way the same thing. The National Rifle Association is an “advocacy group” for the gun lobby and few, if any, SPLC donors would ever accuse the NRA of being a “civil rights organization.”

It may be simple coincidence, but according to the graphic above, the SPLC has enjoyed some of its most profitable years since making the switch.

You can lead a horse to water, as they say, but putting the SPLC’s financial information in an easy-to-read graphic will probably do very little to dissuade the company’s millions of loyal donors, who believe they are getting great value for their money.

To them, getting the SPLC bumper sticker or lapel pin, or whatever thank you tchotchkies the company sends the faithful is what it’s all about.

Virtue signaling is far more important than doing actual work for civil rights.

Heather Heyer: Manufacturing a Martyr

August 10, 2018

As we approach the one year anniversary of the Unite the Right riots in Charlottesville, it is worth taking a moment to reflect on the actions of the Hate Industry as it spun the tragic and needless death of Heather Heyer into media propaganda, or worse yet, into crass fundraising propaganda.

Obviously, any criticism of the canonization of Saint Heather is going to draw cries of “Blasphemy!” from the adherents of the new Social Justice Warrior religion, but our intention here is in no way to criticize, diminish or demean Heather Heyer in any way. Quite the opposite, our intent here is to restore some dignity to the very human Heather Heyer, who was no more prepared for martyrdom that day than anyone else might be.

In December, 2017, James Fields, Jr., the 20-year-old neo-Nazi accused of causing the car crash on Water Street, where Ms. Heyer died, appeared in Charlottesville district court, which did little to answer several basic questions and much to raise other questions still.

Our intent here is in no way to defend Mr. Fields, his philosophy, or that of his ideological companions. Our goal here is to examine the events surrounding the crash in a less hysterical manner than it has been to date. In the process, we have to re-humanize the caricature of Fields and examine the fascist thuggery on both sides of the story, and yes, there is plenty to go around.

First off, this is NOT Heather Heyer. At least it wasn’t on August 12, 2017, the day she died.

Liberty Leading the People

Liberty Leading the People, Eugène Delacroix, 1830

While many media accounts of Heyer’s actions that day would have one believe that she was literally scaling the barricades to strike down the fascist enemies with her bare hands in righteous wrath, the truth is not only very different, but it also paints a far more nuanced portrait of the actual woman. The real Heather Heyer is far more interesting, and far more honorable than the profiteers would have us believe.

In many ways, this oft-used photo isn’t really Heather Heyer either.

Heyer

Obviously, millions will recognize this photo of Heyer, which we believe was originally posted on her Facebook account. The photo is practically ubiquitous across the media and progressive websites. Naturally, the nation’s huge Hate Industry found a way to use the iconic image to cash in on Heyer’s death, as we reported on the Southern Poverty Law Center actions, just two weeks after the Charlottesville riots.

The image is always tightly cropped, with some sites opting to to crop off Ms. Heyer’s Christian cross necklace. Wise men will hesitate to guess a lady’s age, but it is quite possible that this image was taken a few years ago. We base that speculation on a remarkable cell phone video taken by Heather Heyer’s friend and co-worker, Courtney Commander.

That video, linked below, is a record of Heyer taken in the last hours, possibly the last minutes, before her death at the corner of 4th and Water Streets.

We should warn viewers that Ms. Commander laces her speech with expletives, and even refers to a group of Blacks as “them n*gg*rs” at the 5:55 mark. As a Black woman herself, Ms. Commander gets a free pass for using “their word” but it is instructive to note that Ms. Heyer did not surround herself with saints prior to her curbside canonization.

(In another video made the previous evening and embedded at the end of this post, Ms. Commander taunts racist participants in the now-infamous torchlight parade across the University of Virginia campus “Your daughters are home f*ck*ng n*gg*rs right now!”)

In Commander’s video we are presented with images of Heather Heyer the human being.

Commander Cody - Charlottesville VA - Part 4 - YouTube

 

Heyer4
The video shows Heyer as she really was that day, not simply as the glamorized, sanitized icon created by those who would exploit her death. Heyer, like tens of millions of Americans, including this author and many readers, was clearly overweight, and apparently indulged in at least one human vice, smoking.

“So what?,” will say many. “What difference does any of that make?” It is very true that a number of web trolls did seize upon Heyer’s weight in crude attempts to dehumanize and “fat shame” her in the days following her death. Sadly, that kind of stupidity is to be expected from that crowd, as ignorant people have a tendency to say ignorant things.

The greater issue, we believe, is that if these images show Heather Heyer as she really was in her everyday life, and if this is the real-life, flesh-and-blood human being that was Heather Heyer, why did the Left and the Hate Industry crop her down to a single glamour headshot?

Far from “fat shaming” Heather Heyer, the Left is clearly “fat ashamed” of their martyr, whose body morphology differed significantly from most of her Progressive co-counter-protesters.

CounterP

Which is worse? Is there any real difference at all? Has the Left dehumanized Heather Heyer any less than the Alt Right? Both sides have used Heyer’s death for their own purposes.

If you watch the Commander video above, you will see what really set Ms. Heyer apart from most other “counter-protesters” that day. Far from running from barricade to barricade, seeking to smash the hate-filled fascists at every turn, Heather Heyer does something that few on either side seem to be capable of. At about the 4:00 minute mark, Heyer approaches a handful of Alt-Right stragglers and speaks to a woman among them.

Courtney Commander, in a December 18 article in the Daily Beast, says that Heyer asked the woman why she wanted to participate in the Unite the Right rally. There is no screaming, no name-calling, no flinging of feces or urine. Nobody even gets smashed on the head with a bike lock. It is a quiet conversation between two women. Between two human beings. Heyer seems to want to understand where the other woman is coming from. It’s doubtful that the two will ever agree on much, but at least it is an attempt to understand.

That sixty second encounter, which ends with the Alt-Right woman’s “no comment” claim when she sees Commander approaching with her phone camera, is what Heather Heyer should truly be remembered for. And it should be the real-life Heather Heyer who should be remembered and not a sanitized image created without any input from the woman herself.

Heather Heyer died instantly at the scene of the 4th Street car crash, not long after that interaction was filmed. Her cause of death, blunt force trauma to the chest, was released by Charlottesville officials back in October, but her actual manner of death has yet to be released, as of this writing. This fact is crucial to the case against James Fields, as it will determine the actual charges brought against him.

It is especially important to determine the manner of Heyer’s death because of the way it has been portrayed in Social Media, and, more troubling, by the Mainstream Media. There are very real civil rights and due process issues in this case that have been completely ignored, mostly by the Left, in pursuit of political and even financial gain.

What we know for sure is that James Fields participated in the Alt-Right rally on the morning of August 12, 2017. Images of him in a crowd of neo-Nazis, holding a borrowed shield bearing the group’s insignia are easily found online. Fields even turns up in documentary footage shot by National Geographic.

Livestream video shot by amateur journalist Ford Fischer shows Fields’ tinted-out Dodge Challenger rolling slowly down East Water Street less than ten minutes before the fatal crash (at about 00:45 in Fischer’s video.)

At roughly 02:40 in the video, Fischer passes the intersection of 4th and Water Streets, about five minutes before the crash. There are a few people on the street, but nowhere near the crowds shown in later crash videos.

Conspicuously, there is a maroon passenger van shown on 4th Street, as if waiting to make a turn onto Water. That van will be in the same position five minutes later. Police drone video will show the driver of the van standing in front of it at the moment of impact, nearly getting run over by her own vehicle.

So far, the media has yet to identify the driver or her passengers. This is relevant as the drone footage shows numerous people being knocked to the ground by the van after Fields allegedly rammed his car into a Toyota Camry waiting behind the maroon van.

News reports say that upwards of 35 people were injured in the crash, but Fields is being charged with one count of first-degree murder and eight counts of malicious wounding.

Under Virginia law (and no doubt many or all other states), in a multi-vehicle accident, all of the drivers are liable for any injuries they cause with their vehicle, whether they were at fault or not. The driver of the maroon van may technically be responsible for the majority of the non-fatal injuries.

Why was she parked there? It couldn’t be to prevent cars from turning onto 4th Street as 4th is a one-way street.

Another alleged player in the events leading up to the crash is University of North Carolina professor Dwayne Dixon, who has released video claiming it was he who turned Fields off Market Street (VA 250) onto 4th Street at rifle point.

Will Prof. Dixon, who heads a self-described Liberal armed militia calling itself “Redneck Revolt,” (“redneck” being the last socially acceptable racial slur, at least by the Left) be called to testify at Field’s trial this coming November? Will he be charged as an accessory?

As the map below shows, Fields turned off Market Street onto 4th Street near the Market Street Market (whether at Dixon’s threat or of his own volition), just two blocks from the crash scene at the intersection of Water Street (directly next to the improbably named Race Jewelers store).

It should be noted that this section of 4th Street is a one-way box canyon with no other outlet than Water Street. Halfway in between is Charlottesville’s trendy Main Street, a brick-lined pedestrian mall lined with restaurants, stores and theaters.

Crash scene video indicates that the crowd of counter-protesters had not progressed very far up the length of 4th Street at the time of the crash. Recall Ford Fischer’s video showing the intersection practically empty, except for the maroon van only minutes earlier.

The same footage shows paramedics performing CPR on Heather Heyer, only a few feet from the corner of Water Street. In short, Heyer had probably turned north onto 4th Street a few seconds before Fields turned south onto it, two blocks away.

Despite the Left-wing claims that Fields deliberately targeted Saint Heather, who was supposedly climbing the barricades to get at the “haters,” there’s little evidence that either of them had any idea the other existed.

4th Street Map

Another point for the jury to consider is that if Fields’ intent was to deliberately mow down people, why didn’t he just turn onto the pedestrian mall and have at it?

At Fields’ preliminary hearing in December, 2017, the prosecution produced security camera footage of his Challenger backing up 4th Street before surging ahead into the Camry at the intersection. The claim was made that this proves that Fields was backing up to gain more space in which to accelerate, but crash video clearly shows Fields swerving around pedestrians, including those stepping into the street to swing clubs at his car, and tapping his brakes.

We won’t know until November, but it is entirely possible that Fields was looking for another exit from 4th Street.

What is undeniable is that it was Fields’ car that slammed into the Camry, tossing numerous people into the air. Crash video shows several people climbing onto the back of Fields’ car to smash out his rear window with bats and clubs within five seconds of the impact.

Fields’ car shifts into reverse, throwing the people on the trunk aside, and backs all the way back to Market Street at a high rate of speed. Moments later, Fields surrenders to police less than a mile from the crash scene.

If James Fields set out to intentionally run down protesters he didn’t do a very good job of it. And if it was intentional, what did he have to lose by making a run for it rather than surrendering to the first police officers he spotted?

It is entirely possible that it was his plan to hit people with his car all along, and it is also entirely possible that he was a 20 year-old driver who panicked. That won’t absolve him from criminal prosecution, nor should it.

What it should do is to change the Left/Media narrative of Fields as an arch-super-racist to something a lot more mundane. They made him a poster boy for Evil for political and fundraising purposes (yeah… same thing… we know…) but his upcoming trial may simply show him to be a spokesmodel for Stupid.

The biggest question, of course, is whether they can make a first-degree murder charge stick. On October 17, 2017, the Medical Examiner’s office in Richmond determined that Heather Heyer’s cause of death was blunt force trauma to the chest.

What has yet to be determined, or publicly released, is Heyer’s manner of death, which will determine the prosecution’s case against Fields. If Fields’ car caused the blunt force trauma directly, then it should be an open-and-shut case.

If something else caused the trauma, such as one of the other vehicles, or, as shown in Ryan Kelly’s Pulitzer Prize photo, below, the flying body of another victim, the verdict may change.

(Some sources claim that Heather Heyer’s face can be seen in the photo, just below the left knee of the airborne man with the tattooed back. We have no way to confirm or deny at this time.)

Cville Pulitzer

At this point, some people may ask “What difference does it make?” The car that caused the carnage is definitely James Fields’. You can clearly see his license plate in the photo. And the man who got out of that car two minutes later to surrender was definitely James Fields.

The difference is the narrative and it is an important difference. By spinning the tragedy as a deliberate kamikaze-style attack by crazed neo-Nazi, the Media and the Hate Industry have denied any possibility of any other explanation, though they may have gotten the story absolutely right on the first try.

If, on the other hand, Fields turns out to be little more than a stupid 20 year-old (albeit a well-documented neo-Nazi idiot) with a long history of violent behavior problems, then why not simply tell the real story?

The Media has made a lot of money from lurid reports about the Charlottesville riots. You can’t ask for better click bait than a violent story with clear-cut bad guys, including the arch-villain Donald Trump, especially in the dog days of August. “If it bleeds, it leads!”

Hate Industry groups, such as the Southern Poverty Law Center, saw unimaginable windfall “non-profits” from the tragedy. The SPLC reported contributions of $132,044,179 for 2017, nearly three times the $50 million it took in for 2016. With Charlottesville riding on the heels of the election of the very unpopular Donald Trump (among the Left, at any rate), the SPLC’s Progressive donor base couldn’t shell out the virtue signalling donor-dollars fast enough.

One has to ask, is this what Heather Heyer died for? Let the woman rest in peace. She didn’t set out to be a martyr that day any more than anyone else did. She was literally in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Stop exploiting her death for profit. Give Heather Heyer back her dignity and her humanity and honor what she REALLY stood for.

One final note, in an already long-winded post, late in the afternoon of August 12, several hours after Heyer’s death, a Virginia State Police helicopter that had been surveilling the crowds in Charlottesville, crashed in a nearby field, killing pilot Lt. H. Jay Cullen and trooper-pilot Berke M.M. Bates. Many in the Media and the Hate Industry have deliberately conflated the deaths of the two troopers with Unite the Right riots. This is wrong for several reasons:

At the time of the helicopter crash, the troopers were en route to cover the motorcade of Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe. Nobody in their right minds would blame McAuliffe for “causing” the crash.

The helicopter was built in 2000 and had a history of engine problems, including one hard, unpowered landing in 2010. It wasn’t shot down by neo-Nazis and had every bit as much chance of experiencing the engine failure if it were monitoring rush hour traffic or searching for a lost child.

Responsible sources should not attempt to pad the riot death toll for political/fundraising purposes. It cheapens the memories of these brave officers and those of all the others who die in the line of duty.

Below is the video Courtney Commander shot at the torchlight rally on August 11. Be warned that it contains a continuous stream of expletives and many, many racial slurs. Not Safe for Work.

SPLC — Cashing in on MS-13

May 28, 2018

When you have “tracked” the Southern Poverty Law Center for as long as we have, you take it for granted that the company will find a way to make money off the latest tragedy or controversy du jour. The SPLC now has more than 300 full-time employees, many of them involved in marketing, public relations and fundraising and they are not about to let an opportunity to cash in pass them by.

Just over a week ago, President Donald Trump ruffled feathers by referring to members of the violent and deadly Salvadoran gang MS-13, which has infiltrated many American cities and even smaller towns, as “animals.”

Considering the gang’s lengthy record of brutal murders, decapitation, torture and rape, “animals” is one of the kinder terms that could be used to describe them.

Naturally, Mr. Trump’s comments were clumsy and poorly articulated, as usual. Naturally, the SPLC and other Hate Industry players jumped on a chance to claim that the president was referring to all immigrants as “animals.”

Virtue signalers across the country couldn’t get their wallets out fast enough. Despite all the “outrage” and toga rending, Donald Trump has been a gold mine for these “advocacy groups.” The very mention of his name is guaranteed to agitate the donors and the money will soon follow.

According to its online tax records, the SPLC took in over $132 million in donations in 2017, up from $50 million in 2016. Its cash-on-hand endowment fund grew from $319 million to $432 million over the same period. Fully 98% of the endowment fund is designated as “unrestricted” in use.

Ironically (a term one uses so often when describing the company), the SPLC issued several statements declaring that: “Dehumanizing rhetoric — unacceptable from anyone — is especially dangerous when it comes from the mouth of the president.”

Considering the hundreds of millions of tax-free donor-dollars the SPLC has generated over the past decades specifically through the use of “dehumanizing rhetoric,” such as the ever-profitable “hate group” label, “domestic extremists” and “radical traditionalists” one has to wonder how the company avoids choking on its own hypocrisy.

“Unacceptable from anyone…”

Some readers may remember the SPLC’s longtime spokesman, Mark Potok, who was unceremoniously fired from the company in March, 2017, after 20 years of highly lucrative service, most of which was built squarely upon the use of “dehumanizing rhetoric.” Apparently, this usage was quite acceptable when Mr. Potok was channeling millions of donor-dollars into the company’s coffers.

One prime example can be found in a 2007 speech Mr. Potok gave before a hate crime conference in Michigan:

“I don’t think there’s any doubt that these are human beings and it’s a mistake to regard them as just a bunch of sociopaths… though most of them are.”

That zinger drew a laugh from the assembled anti-haters, oddly enough. Potok continued with the statement:

“Let me say… our aim… sometimes the press will describe us as monitoring hate groups and so on. I want to say plainly that our aim in life is to destroy these groups. Completely destroy them!”

Feel the love. Donate early and often.

This brings us to the SPLC’s latest fundraising scheme. Just as the company found ways to cash in on the Confederate flag controversy in 2015 and the tragic death of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville in 2017, the SPLC’s growing team of PR professionals have come up with another classic fundraising scam:

“TELL PRESIDENT TRUMP TO STOP USING RACIST AND DEHUMANIZING RHETORIC,” proclaims the page on the SPLC website. “This kind of rhetoric is unacceptable from anyone,” they remind us, in a brief statement that completely omits any reference to MS-13 whatsoever.

How best to do this? A link to the White House website? No. Mr. Trump’s personal Twitter handle? Nope. Maybe a useful email link to your senators or members of Congress? Not seeing any.

Instead, the SPLC has conveniently provided a short online form where you can enter your name, location and email address. That’s all you have to do.

Tell Trump

What happens to your personal information when you hit the blue button? The site doesn’t say. Maybe your name goes on a petition, though wouldn’t you’d think they’d mention that?

No. Just as with the SPLC’s brilliant, though now-retired, “Stand Strong Against Hate” map and its lucrative offspring, the “Wall of Tolerance,” your contact information will go directly to the company’s massive, in-house fundraising machine, and you put it there yourself, of your own free will.

Just as tens of thousands of SPLC donors, new and old, believe that they are “fighting hate” with their annual donations when their money actually goes to third party telemarketers, you haven’t “taken a stand against hate” any more than you have taken a solemn oath to “work for justice, equality and human rights.”

All you’ve done is given the Southern Poverty Law Center’s fundraisers your personal contact information.

Operators are standing by.

ADL – Anti-Semitic Posts on Twitter

May 13, 2018

A recent report released by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) claims that the organization tracked some 4.2 million anti-Semitic tweets between January 2017 and January 2018. The Media, both traditional and social, repeated the claims widely, giving an impression that Twitter was a hotbed of anti-Semitism.

As with all matters concerning “hate,” in the Media, a closer look is warranted.

First off, anti-Semitism is a very real and a very dangerous social phenomenon. While even one hateful tweet is one too many, the definition of “hate” is nebulous at best and often tailored to the goals of the people defining it. To fully understand the reality on the ground it is imperative to review the definitions and methodologies used in creating  such reports. Let’s check the facts.

The ADL’s report, Quantifying Hate: A Year of Anti-Semitism on Twitter (no authors are named) claims that a review of English language tweets over 2017, using both computer algorithms and human review, yielded 4.2 million anti-Semitic tweets and re-tweets by 3 million users.

“The current findings are based on a complex Boolean query designed to identify language frequently used by anti-Semites.

The query was broadly written to encompass obvious expressions of anti-Semitism, including classic anti-Semitic stereotypes; code words and symbols sometimes used in an anti-Semitic fashion; and also subtle references to anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.”

The query was indeed “broadly written” and was “designed to detect anti-Semitism in the following categories:

  1. Classic anti-Semitic stereotypes (e.g. references to Jews as greedy; controllers of banks, media, governments and academia; under-miners of culture and racial purity; cursed for killing Jesus; etc.)

  2. Positive references to or promotion of known anti-Semitic personalities, authors, books, articles, videos and podcasts

  3. References to anti-Semitic conspiracy theories (e.g. Jewish control of the Federal Reserve; the existence of a “Zionist Occupation Government,” etc.)

  4. Holocaust denial

  5. Epithets used for Jews (e.g. “kike”) and against Jews (e.g. “goddamn Jews”)

  6. Code words and anti-Semitic symbols such as the “echo symbol” (“((( )))”)

The current report includes criticism of Israel or Zionism when such criticism makes use of classic anti-Semitic language or conspiracy theories, or when it ascribes evil motivations to significant numbers of Jews. General criticism of Israel or its policies is not counted as anti-Semitism.

That covers a lot of territory, and, as the report’s Table of Contents indicates, includes several topics that may be, at best, tangentially associated with actual anti-Semitism.

ADL TOC

Including references to Harvey Weinstein, George Soros, Zionism and “globalists” will undoubtedly uncover many genuine anti-Semitic references but will also include many legitimate criticisms of cultural and political movements and players.

Let’s dig a little deeper:

  • As of 2017, Twitter had 330 million active users, of which 100 million were active daily
  • Over 500,000,000 tweets are sent every day, or 182 BILLION a year. A 2012 survey estimated that 38% of all tweets were in English, though this percentage has most certainly changed since then. The ADL study limited its sample to English language tweets only.
  • The United States makes up 21% of all Twitter users worldwide. Lacking demographic data later than the 2012 report referenced above, and excluding all tweets from other English speaking countries, (The UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, etc.) and tweets in English from other countries, a simple one-for-one extrapolation (21% of users accounting for 21% of tweets) would suggest that Americans sent more than 38 billion tweets in 2017.

    Obviously, not all American tweets were in English, but even 75% of this incredibly low-balled estimate would yield 28 billion tweets, of which the ADL found 4 million to be questionable, or .014%.

  • An ADL press release notes that, whatever the actual number of English tweets studied for 2017, only 55,000 “were manually reviewed for the presence of anti-Semitism.”
  • A 2017 peer-reviewed study estimated that between nine and 15% of all Twitter users were computer generated “bots.”

In short, the methodology used in the ADL’s Twitter report was, at best, “broad,” and at worst, unreliable. The report includes a disclaimer referencing “the rise of ‘QAnon’ conspiracy theories” that illustrates just how broadly the term “anti-Semitism” was interpreted:

“The vast majority of QAnon-inspired conspiracy theories have nothing to do with anti-Semitism. However, a small percentage of tweets referencing QAnon also referred to Israel, Jews, Zionists, Rothschilds … , or George Soros. 

This study’s methodology does not allow us to determine how many of the QAnon tweets containing those terms actually expressed anti-Semitic sentiment, but an impressionistic review revealed some troubling examples.”

“Impressionistic reviews” revealing “some troubling examples” are not the stuff of hard research. It should be noted that the Anti-Defamation League, like the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), is a private “advocacy group,” which by its very definition means that the organization is “advocating” a particular point of view.

Online tax records indicate that the ADL averaged between $50- and $60 million dollars in donations a year between 2011 and 2016, with 2% to 2.5% of that money going to “program services,” such as this anonymous survey, and 40% to 45% going to “Executive compensation, other salaries and wages.”

With tens of millions of dollars in compensation at stake, a strong financial incentive to interpret anti-Semitism as broadly as possible cannot be ignored.

As we noted at the beginning of this post, the Media, in all its forms, gladly repeats the claims of the ADL and SPLC without performing any review. Lurid claims of “hate groups” everywhere and anti-Semitism on the rise make for profitable click bait. The Media also have an undeniable financial incentive for promoting such “reports” without ever asking to see the evidence.

Again, anti-Semitism is a very real thing and must not be tolerated in any way, but lumping criticism of George Soros’ political activities and re-tweets of anonymous QAnon conspiracy theories is not a legitimate method of documenting it.

Research for the report was allegedly performed by two ADL in-house organizations, the ADL’s Center on Extremism and Center on Technology and Society, with no external peer review or oversight.

If the data is good the results ought to be easily replicable independently. Anonymous reports generated by in-house organs simply do not meet basic research standards.

Big claims demand big proof and the ADL needs to show its work. A poorly estimated 4 million suspicious tweets out of tens of billions posted in 2017 is statistically insignificant.

Prove it or remove it.

SPLC — 2018 Telemarketing Scam

April 25, 2018

Earlier this month the Southern Poverty Law Center released its IRS Form 990 tax return, noting that the company took in a staggering $136,373,624 dollars in Fiscal Year 2017 (leaving a paltry “non-profit” of $76,589,303 for the year) and the already-bloated Endowment Fund exploded from $319 million for 2016 to $432 million for 2017, 99.17% of which is “unrestricted” in use.

Page 39 of the document breaks down what the company paid third-party telemarketers for the year. As usual, the amount paid to the telemarketers far exceeded the amount of money raised over the phone in the name of “fighting hate.”

2017 Telemarketers

The SPLC paid four third-party telemarketing companies $3,177,807 donor-dollars to raise only $1,801,207 donor-dollars on its behalf.

This leaves a shortfall of $1,376,600.

As usual, this means that not only did every dime raised from unsuspecting first-time donors go directly to the telemarketers, but thousands upon thousands of longtime donors got tapped to pick up the shortfall without ever realizing it.

How many people does it take to mop up a seven-digit deficit? At $100 dollars a pop, 13,766 loyal, longtime donors. At a more reasonable $25 dollar donation, just over 55,000 suckers.

How can a private advocacy group afford this kind of horrific hemorrhaging year after year? It’s quite simple. The SPLC takes a minor financial hit each year to get the names and addresses of thousands of proven first-time donors. They feed this information into their own huge, uber-efficient in-house fundraising machine and the future donations will roll in for years, if not decades, to come. As the old saying goes, “It takes money to make money.”

Granted, the SPLC is not the only non-profit to engage in this kind of thing, and all donors have a responsibility to ask any telemarketers how much of their donation will actually reach the organization in question.

We at Watching the Watchdogs feel that the public ought to see the real numbers and see for themselves where their money actually goes.

The “Financial Information” page on the SPLC website makes the claim that “During the last fiscal year, approximately 68% of our total expenses were spent on program services.”

That’s a noble goal, and when you look at Line 16b on Page 2 of the Form 990, you see that the company spent 21% of those expenses on out-and-out fundraising. When you add in the $12 million in “joint costs,” those fundraising costs attributed to other departments (“Management” spent just over $1,000,000 on postage, for example) found on Line 26 of Page 11, however, you find that the SPLC spent 41% of its budget on fundraising right off the top.

When you figure in salaries, facilities costs and all of the other expenses of running a company with more than 300 employees, it’s pretty hard to see how 68% of expenses went to “program services.”

In the long run, most of the donors don’t really care. They each have their own concept of “fighting hate” and their canceled donation check or SPLC bumper sticker allows them to virtue signal to the world how wonderful they are.

In short, the donors are buying a product that the Southern Poverty Law Center is only too happy to sell them.

Caveat emptor.

SPLC Executive Suite: 47 Years of “Whites Only”

April 15, 2018

This month the Southern Poverty Law Center released its tax records for 2017, revealing staggering revenues in excess of $136 million (compared to $58 million for 2016), and a bloated cash-on-hand endowment fund approaching half a BILLION dollars.

We’ll take a closer look at those numbers in upcoming posts. While profits at the company are at levels never seen before, there is one glaring statistic that has remained steadfastly unchanged since the Nixon Administration.

In 1994, Dan Morse and Greg Jaffe, two reporters from the SPLC’s hometown newspaper, the Montgomery Advertiser, published an 8-day exposé of the company. Amazingly, the reporters discovered that 23 years after opening its doors for business in 1971, there were no minorities among the top leadership of the “nation’s leading civil rights organization.”

The headline for the lead article in the series reads: “Equal Treatment? No Blacks in Center’s Leadership”

“Inside, no blacks have held top management positions in the center’s 23-year history, and some former employees say blacks are treated like second-class citizens.”

The article noted that the handful of Black attorneys hired in the company’s early days had all quit, some citing a “plantation mentality,” and that the only African-American in any position of authority managed the mail room, where she had worked for the past 20-odd years.

Equal treatment

Fast forward to November 2000, when Ken Silverstein noted in his landmark article for Harper’s Magazine, “The Church of Morris Dees,” that nothing had changed since Morse and Jaffe’s articles had been published.

When we first read these surprising claims in 2009 we were astonished and set out to discover if the SPLC had ever gotten around to practicing what it so profitably preached. Using the company’s IRS Form 990 tax returns, (which can now be found on the ProPublica website, going back to 2001), we found that the Executive Suite of the Southern Poverty Law Center was just as white in 2008 as it had been in 1978, 1988 and 1998.

Here we are in 2018 and the SPLC’s monochromatic streak remains unbroken:

2017 Execs

2017 salaries

2016 and 2015

2014 and 2013

2012 and 2011

Our clumsy Photoshop fumbling aside, it becomes readily apparent that SPLC founder Morris Dees has no intention of integrating Executive Suite any time soon.

Perhaps the most glaring exception from the annual “highest paid” officer list is Lecia Brooks, who joined the SPLC in 2004 and currently holds TWO directorships at the company simultaneously, something no other officer has ever done.

lecia_brooks

Lecia Brooks

Ms. Brooks has NEVER appeared on the “highest paid” list, even when the salaries listed dipped to a paltry $70,000 a year. Meanwhile, her all-white co-Directors, even the company’s head secretary, have been pulling down six-digit salaries for decades.

Among Ms. Brooks’ highly paid co-Directors is Maureen Costello, who runs the SPLC’s “Teaching Tolerance” wing, which purports to promote diversity in the K-12 classroom. In that same 1994 Montgomery Advertiser article that noted no Blacks at the top, Morse and Jaffe noted this interesting factoid:

“The Law Center’s ambitious new project, Teaching Tolerance, which is designed to promote racial and cultural justice throughout America’s schools, is produced by an eight-member all-white staff according to the Law Center.”

While Teaching Tolerance does not publish the names of its rank-and-file staff, its Directors have always been whites, since its founding in 2004, except for a brief interregnum in 2010, when Lecia Brooks was allowed to keep the seat warm until the highly diverse Ms. Costello could be hired.

Costello

Maureen Costello

In closing, it is worth noting that many long-time SPLC donors and watchers may recall that the company’s first president was Julian Bond, the legendary civil rights activist from the 1960s. “Julian Bond was Black,” they’ll say, “So Morris Dees does hire minorities for top positions!”

As usual with Mr. Dees and the SPLC, a closer look at the facts tells a different story.

On page 132 of his 1991 autobiography, “A Season for Justice,” (reprinted verbatim in 2003 as “A Lawyer’s Journey“), Dees writes about the earliest days of the SPLC when he was preparing to mail out the very first of that organization’s fund-raising appeals, (using the 700,000-plus names on the donor list he received for “volunteering” to serve as finance manager for George McGovern’s presidential bid.)

Dees had made his millions in direct-mail marketing, not law, and he knew how to write a successful sales pitch:

“Before we could ask for money, we had to establish credibility. We needed a prominent figure whose presence would announce the center’s values and promise. Julian Bond seemed the perfect choice.”

“I had never met Julian Bond. My friend Chuck Morgan… working for the ACLU… arranged a meeting in Atlanta. When I told [Bond] about our hopes and plans, he agreed to serve as president of the Law Center, a largely honorary position.”

A memo from 1971 in the Julian Bond Papers collection at the University of Virginia indicates that the “honorary president” was paid a monthly “fee” (not “salary”) of $1,000 a month in exchange for his signature on fundraising letters written by Morris Dees in Julian Bond’s name.

Bond had returned to college in Atlanta in 1971 and remained there throughout his entire honorary presidency, a good three-hour drive from Montgomery on today’s highways.

Julian Bond was a paid celebrity endorser and no more, as noted by the fact that Bond gets exactly two paragraphs in Dees’ 335-page memoir and is never heard from again.

Julian Bond had no more to do with running the Southern Poverty Law Center than Michael Jordan has with running Hanes.

You have to hand it to Morris Dees, though. He’s managed to keep his Head Office lily-white for nearly fifty years. Even the NFL and NBA couldn’t pull that off.

 

SPLC — 2018 Hate Map: Fake News Galore

February 25, 2018

The Southern Poverty Law Center recently released its 2018 “Hate Map” fundraising tool, and as usual, the Media is regurgitating the company’s claims without performing even the most rudimentary fact-checks.

Fortunately, that’s what we here at Watching the Watchdogs do best.

First, a little housekeeping:

  1. The 2018 “Hate Map,” as with all of its predecessors, refers to the number of alleged “hate groups” the SPLC designated for the previous fiscal year. The 2018 map refers to alleged groups from FY 2017.
  2. There is no legal or even universal definition for the term “hate group,” which is why even the FBI cannot, does not, designate “hate groups,” but somehow a private “advocacy group” can do so, early and often.
  3. Even the SPLC, which is the sole arbiter of the lucrative “hate group” label, does not have a firm definition for “hate group” beyond the nebulous and elastic claim that “All hate groups have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”That “definition” is suitably vague enough to be applied to nearly anything. As we will soon see, a “group” need not even be an actual boots-on-the-ground “group” to be included on the list. The “Hate Map” is rife with one-man websites, online vendors and nearly 300 “Statewide” phantoms.
  4. As Mark Potok, the SPLC’s former longtime Intelligence Director, stated publicly on numerous occasions: “…a “hate group” has nothing to do with criminality… [or] potential for violence…” Rather, as Potok put it, “It’s all about ideology.”No crime. No violence. Just “wrong thinking.”

    According to the SPLC, “Hate group activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing.” That any advocacy group could deliberately conflate six of the most fundamental First Amendment civil rights with “criminal acts” and “hate group activities” is beyond belief.

    Under this “definition,” Dr. King, the Freedom Riders and anyone even remotely associated with the Civil Rights Movement would be guilty of “hate group activities.”

With this background information in mind, let’s have a look at the 2018 “Hate Map.”

The latest “hate group” count is up from 917 to 954, which, in the wake of the very real racial tensions of 2017, including the Charlottesville riots, is a surprisingly low increase of only 4%

Keep in mind, when you are the sole arbiter of the “hate group” label, you can make up as many as you want. The Media, and more importantly, the almighty donors, would have swallowed nearly any number the company saw fit to claim.

As mentioned above, the SPLC cannot actually locate 297 of these groups on any map, including their own. This number includes 291 “Statewide” chapters, for which no information other than an alleged home state is provided, as well as two groups skulking in “Incomplete,” one each in “Eastern” and “Central” Pennsylvania and one each in “North” and “South” California.

Hard data doesn’t get any harder than this, folks. Fortunately, the Media and the donors aren’t all that big into facts.

It’s also worth mentioning that there were “only” 191 “Statewide” phantoms on last year’s map, for a surge of 51%, meaning the company is losing “groups” faster than it can designate them. That 4% increase must have come from somewhere.

The SPLC provides no information on these alleged groups whatsoever. It cannot provide a known location or any kind of headcount for the membership. We get to take the company’s word for it that these “groups” really, really exist.

That’s not good enough and it certainly isn’t good journalism. Big claims demand big proof, or any proof, for that matter.

This year, Watching the Watchdogs is launching the hashtag #ProveItOrRemoveIt to encourage the SPLC into showing its proof that any of its 954 alleged groups actually exist.

Well, surprisingly, despite coming off the most racist year in decades, the increase didn’t come from the reliable Ku Klux Klan bogeyman. According to the fearmongers at the SPLC, Klan groups actually decreased by 45% in 2017, from 130 to 72, tying the record low set during the Obama Administration.

The SPLC attributes the precipitous drop to the fact that today’s white supremacists are put off by the old fashioned image of the Invisible Empire. Today’s racists pine for a “hipper” image, they posit.

2018 Ku Klux Klan _ Southern Poverty Law Center

While homeless “Statewide” phantoms made up 23% of of the Klan groups on the 2017 map, that number has increased to 39% of the much smaller count for 2018.

Neo-Nazis seemed to be all the rage in 2017 and the “Hate Map” backs that up by claiming a 21% increase in Hitler wannabees from 99 alleged groups to 120 last year.

What the report doesn’t mention directly (you have to look for it, as we do) is that the number of “Statewide” Neo-Nazi phantoms “exploded” by 100%, from 45 to 91.

White Nationalists remained stagnant at 100 alleged groups last year, surprisingly. The number of WN “Statewide” phantoms barely inched up at all, from 30 to 35. Given the lurid media coverage of Charlottesville and other atrocities, one could be excused for predicting unprecedented growth in 2017.

Even the Racist Skinheads took a hit last year, down from 79 to 71 alleged groups, though the number of “Statewide,” “Central” and “Eastern” generalities grew from 60 to 63.

Say that last part out loud: The Southern Poverty Law Center cannot account for EIGHTY-NINE PERCENT of its alleged Racist Skinhead groups and yet the Media considers the numbers to be utterly reliable. Wow.

Considering that it was the removal of Confederate war statues that sparked the Charlottesville riots and at least a few other confrontations last year, readers may be surprised to learn that the number of “Neo-Confederate” groups designated by the SPLC last year dropped by an incredible 29%, from 43 to 31 alleged groups.

“Statewide” chapters celebrating the “Lost Cause” dipped slightly from seven to six, but on the plus side, Weogufka, Alabama, (Population: 282) joined Wetumpka, AL, and Waxahachie, Texas, on the list. (This really isn’t statistically relevant, but it is fun to say out loud.)

Anti-Immigrant, Anti-LGBT, Anti-Muslim and Christian Identity groups all remained largely unchanged for the year, so where exactly do we find any actual increases?

This year marks the debut of an entirely new “hate group” category, the Neo-Volkisch, which the SPLC describes thus:

“Neo-Völkisch adherents worship the Norse or Germanic gods, spirituality premised on the survival of white Europeans and the preservation of dead or dying cultures they presume to embody. Such individuals and groups use a variety of terms to describe their spirituality such as Odinism or Wotanism, Odalism, heathenism, Ásatrú or even paganism. Qualifiers like “Germanic” or “proto-Germanic” are sometimes attached to those terms. Other qualifiers like “Norse tradition” might also be used.”

Are they dangerous?

“…violence rarely erupts from the neo-Völkisch movement.”

So why are they a “hate group” now?

“Hyper-masculine imagery fetishized within neo-Völkisch spheres reinforces misogyny and traditional gender roles.”

Dear Freya! Not “traditional gender roles”! Oh, the humanity! What does that say about the Amish, Muslims, Orthodox Jewry and a large percentage of Latino immigrants? Will those hyper-masculine men make next year’s “Hate Map”?

So where are the 28 Neo-Volkisch groups located? Just where you’d expect to find Norsemen: Grand Rapids, Michigan, Brownsville and Grass Valley, California, Knoxville, Tennessee, Lynchburg, Virginia, and that perennial hotbed of hyper-masculine, horn-helmed hatred, Apache Junction, Arizona.

The other 22 alleged chapters? “Statewide.” Yes, friends, the SPLC has uncovered 28 chapters of a new species of “hate,” but they cannot tell you where 79% of them are actually located.

“That makes perfect sense to us!” quoth the Media. “Nothing to see here…”

In keeping with the man-bashing, the SPLC added a second new category last year, Male Supremacy. Calling it “the gateway drug to the Alt-Right,” (yes, someone was actually paid cash money to write that…), the two new “Male Supremacist” groups seem to be websites, rather than boots-on-the-ground groups that actually do things. The SPLC cites several blogs to prove their existence.

And, wait for it… 100% of these wimmin-hater “groups” are “Statewide.”

Last year, the SPLC counted 201 Black and Black Muslim groups in the land, the largest category by far.

(Even though this number included 68 chapters of the Nation of Islam and eight other Black Muslim groups tucked under the catch-all heading of “General Hate,” subsection, “Other,” none of these Islam-based groups have been deemed to be actual “Muslim hate groups” because the SPLC doesn’t track such things. Irks the donors, dontcha know, and that can run into money.)

This year the number of Black and Black Muslim “hate groups” has increased to 241, including the eight aforementioned “Other” groups, for an increase of 20%. The number of self-described Muslim groups rose from 68 to 94.

As the SPLC’s own chart indicates, these alleged Black “hate groups” have increased by more than 400% since the start of the century.

2018-Black Nationalist _ Southern Poverty Law Center

“Not to worry,” You may say. “The odds are that 8 out of 10 of these alleged “groups” are homeless “Statewide” phantoms.” Actually, only eight out of 241 are “Statewide,” up by a few pegs from last year.

Among the crimes attributed to these “Black Nationalist” groups are “forms of black nationalism [that] are strongly anti-white and anti-Semitic, and a number of religious versions assert that blacks — not Jews — are the Biblical “chosen people” of God.”

Yes, that is correct. The Southern Poverty Law Center has determined who the REAL “chosen people” of God are. Any other group claiming the mantle for themselves is practicing “hate.” Seriously.

Ah, but it plays well with many of the donors of the Fundamentalist Christian and Jewish persuasions.

And that, friends, is the whole purpose of the fantastically lucrative “Hate Map.” As shown, the numbers are not based in any kind of reality, the SPLC cannot identify how many people are actually in these alleged groups and makes no claim that the alleged groups are potentially violent or criminal.

“It’s strictly ideological,” said Mark Potok, and those ideologies, held by a pathetically minute portion of the US population today, are what agitate the donors and power the SPLC’s enormous money machine. Here are a few other things Mr. Potok has had to say about “hate groups” and the SPLC’s methodology:

“The numbers are absolutely soft,” said Mark Potok, a Southern Poverty Law Center spokesman. “We are talking about a tiny number of Americans who are members of hate groups – I mean, infinitesimal.” (Arlene Levinson, “Hate Groups, Crimes Said Rare in US,” Associated Press, July 8, 1999).

“We see this political struggle, right? …I mean we’re not trying to change anybody’s mind. We’re trying to wreck the groups, and we are very clear in our head, this is… we are trying to destroy them. Not to send them to prison unfairly or not take their free speech rights away… but as a political matter, to destroy them.”  (Holiday, 2008, track 13, https://archive.org/details/MarkPotok).

“I don’t think there’s any doubt that these are human beings and it’s a mistake to regard them as just a bunch of sociopaths… though most of them are. Let me say… our aim… sometimes the press will describe us as monitoring hate groups and so on. I want to say plainly that our aim in life is to destroy these groups. Completely destroy them!” (Sept. 2007,  https://youtu.be/fnTz2ylJo_8)

Clearly, neither Mr. Potok, before he got the boot from the company about a year ago, nor any of the six-digit-salaried white millionaires who run the company, or any of the other 295 company employees have any desire or any intention of “destroying” any “hate groups” anytime soon. You don’t kill the Golden Goose.

The SPLC is a multimillion-dollar “advocacy group.” It’s product is “hate group” fearmongering and its loyal customers are the almighty donors, nearly all of whom self-identify as “Progressive.” The company sells the customers what they want and the customers cannot get enough of the product. It’s a business, folks, not a mission.

Charity Navigator says they could be looking at a cool Billion-with-a-B donor-dollars for Fiscal 2017. Those numbers are due out soon and we look forward to breaking them down thereafter.

Charity Navigator: SPLC Donations for 2017 Could Reach One Billion Dollars

December 28, 2017

The Southern Poverty Law Center won’t release its annual IRS Form 990 tax return until February, but preliminary reports indicate that 2017 donations could approach ONE BILLION DOLLARS.

Charity Navigator, a nationally respected rating service of non-profit organizations, noted last April that donations to the SPLC during the first 100 days of the Trump Administration, from January 20 to April 20, 2017 were up by 1,400%.

Charity Navigator, First 100 Days

Source: Charity Navigator

While we do not have the actual figures for that period, the SPLC’s current Form 990 indicates that the company received just over $50 million in donations for FY 2016, which would average out to $12.5 million a quarter.

Math was never our strong suit, we freely admit, but if our back-of-the-envelope calculations are correct, a 1,400% increase on $12.5 million would come to a staggering $187,500,000 for a single quarter alone.

If there are any mathematicians in the house, or functional numerates of any kind, please speak up if these numbers are off in any way.

IF the figures above are accurate, and we multiply them by four to get a total for a full fiscal year, we come up with a nice, round $750,000,000 overall. That’s three-quarters of a billion dollars to you and me.

Keep in mind that total SPLC receipts from 2001 to 2016 “only” add up to around $624 million COMBINED and you can start to comprehend the magnitude of this statistic.

SPLC profits 2001 to 2016

And these numbers only reflect the increase on an average SPLC fiscal quarter. Charity Navigator’s estimate only extends to April, 2017, and while the country experienced numerous political and social events during the year, both Trump- and non-Trump-related, the real floodgates to SPLC donations opened in August, following the infamous Charlottesville riots.

At that time, major corporations, artists and celebrities threw millions at the SPLC in ham-fisted attempts to out-virtue signal each other as to who really hated “hate” more, and that does not include the uncounted number of individual donors who followed suit.

The SPLC makes it so easy to strike a pose and assuage your white guilt: just write a check.

And, as we noted at the time, it only took the SPLC two weeks to figure out how to cash in on the death of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville by slapping her photo on their unscrupulous “Wall of Tolerance” fundraising tool.

We won’t have any idea of the actual magnitude of money that changed hands until next February, but as the SPLC’s fiscal year closes on October 31 each year, it is reasonable to predict that the final quarter of August through October will show an increase far in excess of a mere 1,400%.

The good news is that with a billion dollars in cash coming in, the SPLC can finally retire from the odious fundraising business and live off the interest. Granted, that could put hundreds of SPLC employees out of work, but with the nation’s most profitable non-profit on their resumés, it won’t be long before they are snapped up by other hopeful contenders for the title.

You read it here first, folks.

SPLC profits from “I Am So Sick of White Guys” coloring book

December 23, 2017

As we have noted uncounted times on this blog, there is no legal or even standard definition for a “hate group.” Even the Southern Poverty Law Center, a company that rakes in hundreds of millions of dollars by selling “hate groups” to Progressives, does not have an actual definition for the term.

Instead, the company cooked up a non-definition that is so broad that anyone could figure out some way to apply it to just about any group they wanted. According to the experts at the SPLC:

“All hate groups have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”

If those are the SPLC’s only criteria, “attacking or maligning an entire class of people,” then does it strike anyone else as odd that “the nation’s leading civil rights organization,” (at least when it was still in the civil rights business several years ago) is accepting a cash percentage from the sales of something called the “I Am So Sick of White Guys” coloring book?

 

Sick-of-White-Guys-book

 

“Relax,” say the authors. This isn’t maligning an entire class of people… it’s satire! Get it?

Sure we get it. Try swapping out the descriptor “White” from the title with any other color/ethnicity in the Diversity Rainbow and see how much fun it is. Change “Guys” to “Gals” (Chicks dig it when you call them “gals,” btw) and watch the Feminist fur fly. Try it at home, “I’m so sick of One-legged, African-American LGBTQRSTUV Activists!.” Why, the variations just write themselves. No “hate” here, after all. It’s satire, fer cryin’ out loud!

As the co-authors, who are both evil white guys themselves, remind us “Be open to hearing other perspectives or opinion. And don’t be so defensive.” Spoken like true Progressives. Say anything you please, as long as we permit it.

Want to have a real hoot? Swap out the picture of Putin with one of George Soros holding the strings. The Anti-Defamation League, which does not have a good track record with satire, will be all over you like the yellow-tooth stink on an Antifa bandana. There’s too much money at stake, don’t you know?

And speaking of money, catch the note at the very bottom of the cover stating that ten percent of this ten-dollar treasure will be donated to the SPLC. Thank heavens for that. According to this year’s online tax records, the company came into 2017 with less than $320 million in tax-free, unrestricted cash-on-hand. This boon could be a game changer.

Or could it? Let’s say they can sell 100,000 copies of this adult coloring book. The $10 grand sent to the SPLC would barely buy a single hour of Millionaire Morris Dees’ frequent speaker’s “honoraria,” and only then if your group wasn’t composed of evil white males. Otherwise, “No dough? No Mo.”

Let’s be optimistic, though. As the SPLC well knows, there are millions of people out there who are really, really sick of white males. Let’s say these guys manage to sell ONE MILLION COPIES of their magnum opus. That’s $100,000 to the cash-strapped SPLC, a whole lot of moolah in anybody’s book.

Well, in anybody’s book except the SPLC’s bookkeeper’s book. Last year the SPLC paid third-party telemarketers $2,266,887 donor-dollars to raise only $1,271,287 donor-dollars, for a net loss of $955,600. A lousy hundred grand wouldn’t even scratch the surface of such an incredible deficit. Instead, the SPLC will simply redirect the donations of everyone who gave through the telemarketers, as well as another 10,000 to 40,000 rank-and-file loyal SPLC donors.

At the end of the day, what we have here is a perfect example of “virtue signalling.” The authors are merely piling on to a bandwagon that has seen celebrities and major corporations demonstrating how much they hate “hate” by simply sending a check to the SPLC, and that doesn’t include the millions of new individual donors the company will pick up this year. That’s all you have to do. Send a little cash to a company that already has more money than it will ever spend and you can sleep the sleep of the Righteous.

Too bad so much of that money will go to pay the telemarketers and the six-digit salaries of the SPLC’s all-white Executive Suite. No matter. “Hate” was fought, after all.

The SPLC has no problem whatsoever if you want to bash white males (as long as they are not gay, Jewish, or one of the other more recent protected status groups) as long as you a) fig-leaf it as satire (“Can’t you take a joke?”), and b) cut the SPLC in for a slice of the pie. No hypocrisy here. Move along.

Don’t take our word for it. Go the company’s website and search “coloring book” and see if you can find anything that says “The SPLC refuses to accept money from a group that attacks or maligns an entire class of people.”

That would be bad for business.


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