Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

SPLC — 2017 Telemarketing Scam

February 4, 2017

The Southern Poverty Law Center has released its IRS Form 990 and Audited Financial Report for F/Y 2016, and as predicted, it was a very profitable year for the company.

Part of of that success comes from the SPLC’s use of third-party telemarketers who convince first-time donors that their money will be used to somehow “fight hate.” In reality, their money, and that of thousands of existing SPLC donors, will be used to fight poverty — for the telemarketers, that is.

As we’ve reported in years past, the SPLC pays these telemarketers far more than they raise over the phone. Last year the company paid telemarketers $2,266,887 donor-dollars to raise only $1,271,287 donor-dollars, for a net loss of $955,600 (p. 40).

2017-telemarketing-numbers

As usual, the big winner was Grassroots Campaigns who were paid $1.8 million to raise just over $600,000. Telefund only pocketed 62% of the $340,000 it raised, while Harris Marketing kept 83% of the $256,800 it took in.

Since 2011, the SPLC has paid Grassroots  $5,828,603 more than they received in donations. While it seems incongruous that a company like the SPLC, which is forever sending out fundraising letters, as “the need has never been greater,” would be able to survive such financial hemorrhaging, the truth is they’ll make a fortune from it.

In essence, the SPLC is paying the telemarketers for the personal information of thousands of proven first-time donors, which they will feed into their own uber-efficient in-house fundraising machine. They take a loss on the first year but make it up with years, or even decades of successive donations down the road, at a sweet 100% profit.

The company isn’t even taking that much of a hit, as all of the first-time donations go straight to the telemarketers and any deficit is made up out of the existing donor pot, without any of the donors being the wiser.

How many long-time donors does it take to make up a $955,600 “shortage”? At $100 a pop, just under 10,000 donors. At a more reasonable $25 donation rate, just under 40,000 well-meaning suckers.

Granted, the use of third-party telemarketers for such purposes is not illegal and is practiced by many of the largest non-profits in the country. It’s up to the potential donor to ask the solicitor how much of their money will actually reach the SPLC.

Since Grassroots is paid a flat fee, they can even tell Grandma with a straight face that all of her donation will go to “fight hate.” That the SPLC is only going to triple the amount and send it back to Grassroots is merely a minor detail.

We’ve only just made our first pass over the SPLC’s latest financials. Stay tuned for more information on where the money goes.

SPLC — Hoaxed Again!

December 22, 2016

In another ham-fisted fear campaign, the Southern Poverty Law Center has embarked on a series of unsubstantiated, unverified and largely anecdotal “reports” that claim hundreds of “hate incidents” (not to be confused with actual hate crimes) and over a thousand “incidents” have recently been reported across the country at large and hundreds more occurring within the nation’s school systems.

The undeniable cause of this effect? It could only be the hate-filled election of Donald Trump, right? What else could it be (that would still agitate the donors into forking over more money)?

As we have been reporting over the weeks since the election, neither SPLC “report” stands up to the slightest breath of fact checking. The company makes huge claims of receiving thousands of reports over a web page on their website where anyone in the world can “report an incident” and they themselves disclaim that their “Trump Effect” survey of “educators” is not scientific because the respondents were not chosen at random, there’s no mechanism to verify that the respondents were even “educators” and all of the responses were anecdotal.

The results of this survey are not scientific. The respondents were not selected in a manner to ensure a representative sample; those who responded may have been more likely to perceive problems than those who did not.

Opening her report on “election-related bias” in the elementary schools, Teaching Tolerance’s Maureen Costello makes the bizarre claim that:

“Every student, from preschoolers up through high school, is aware of the tone, rhetoric and catch-phrases of this particular campaign season.”

Really, Maureen? Every student glued to the debates, watching Meet the Press over their weekend Lucky Charms and Pop Tarts? Even kindergartners? Really? Costello peppered her report with anonymous quotes to prove that Hell’s hand-basket has arrived. [Caution: Some readers may find the following graphic content disturbing.]

One Muslim girl clung to her kindergarten teacher on November 9 and asked, “Are they going to do anything to me? Am I safe?” – Early Childhood Teacher, Tennessee

A lesbian student’s mother was telling her that life as we knew it was over, and she was quite distraught about her mother. Children are very worried about being deported or killed. – Elementary Counselor, Illinois

Pretty heart-wrenching stuff, no? It’s hard enough being a lesbian in the third grade without Donald Trump sending your mom over the edge, and let’s face it, Elementary Counselor — Illinois has never lied to us before.

On the national scene, more anonymous reports and more disclaimers that the anonymous reports were pretty much all anecdotal.

A Latina woman in Texas reported: I was walking my baby at my neighborhood park and a truck drove by with a male driving and a female passenger. The female yelled “white power” at us as they drove by and then sped away.

It doesn’t get much more Trump-related than that, or more undeniable. After all, it’s “anecdotal,” right?

November 15: “These incidents, aside from news reports, are largely anecdotal.”

December 16: “The SPLC made every effort to verify each report, but many included in the count remain anecdotal.”

 anecdotal
adjective

  1. (of an account) not necessarily true or reliable, because based on personal accounts rather than facts or research: ‘while there was much anecdotal evidence there was little hard fact’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/anecdotal

The SPLC “reports” do include several media reports, and if the anonymous, anecdotal incidents were not proof enough, “Many harassers invoked Trump’s name during assaults, making it clear that the outbreak of hate stemmed in large part from his electoral success.”

This time, the SPLC got it right. A growing number of “incidents” really were directly tied to Trump’s election.

ten-days-after

And the suspect is…

andrew-mcclinton-arrested

Unlike the SPLC, we’re not going to jump to any conclusions because the authorities are still working through the case, and unlike the SPLC, we believe that everyone is innocent until proven guilty in a court of law, not a court of public opinion.

The same goes for this gentleman:

philly

And him:

palmer

And this young “activist”:

volk

This young woman says she made her story up because she was late for curfew:

yasmin

Let’s be honest. A lot of hateful, ignorant things have been said before and after the election, with no shortage of them coming from Trump himself, and sadly, there is no shortage of knuckleheads who will commit hoaxes in accordance with the voices they hear in their heads.

One thing you can always count on, the SPLC will find a way to build a classic fearmongering campaign around them.

THIS JUST IN: A gay couple were removed from a JetBlue flight today for allegedly verbally abusing Donald Trump’s daughter, Ivanka, and her family, who were flying commercial.

According to tweets by one of the men, his husband was upset to find Trump’s family on the flight and was “chasing them down to harass them.” [Who says one spouse can’t testify against another? Someone’s going to have a lot of ‘splainin’ to do when they get home tonight.]
ivanka

Finally, SPLC, a genuine “election-related hate incident” for your collection. Let’s see if it makes it onto the list.

SPLC — Why is the “Hate Map” Static?

August 31, 2016

This week has seen repeated online headlines reading that “White Lives Matter has been designated a ‘hate group'” by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), broadcast from a number of media sites, some of them major players, here, here, here, here, here and here.

What most news outlets, from the New York Times to Time magazine to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution neglect to mention is that is that the SPLC won’t actually get around to adding White Lives Matter to its “Hate Map” fundraising tool until February, 2017. But six months from now, WLM is going to have a place on the Wall of Shame, by golly.

This raises the question, and admittedly, such heresy borders on flagrant “journalism,” as to why the SPLC’s “Hate Map” is static in a world of dynamic websites?

The oft-repeated photo accompanying the SPLC’s polished press releases, dutifully reprinted in online media sites across the board, shows a handful of neo-Nazi wannabes desperate to get a rise from the media, as the local populations have shown little interest in WLM’s blather.

WLM.png

There they are, America, the existential threat that ought to keep your eyes wide open at night and your checkbook wide open by day. Think about it.

So to get back to the uncomfortable question, why IS the SPLC’s “Hate Map” fundraising tool static when every media website, social media outlet or even private blog, such as our own Watching the Watchdogs dynamic? It makes no sense, unless you follow the money.

The SPLC releases its annual “Hate Map” every spring, purporting to identify all “hate groups” across the nation on a state-by-state basis from the previous year. Oddly enough, there is no legal definition for “hate group,” so the “groups” listed are purely at the whim of the SPLC, which receives no external oversight or review.

In short, we KNOW the “groups” listed on the SPLC’s “Hate Map” fundraising tool, which include t-shirt shops, one-man blogs and an Italian restaurant outside Pittsburgh, really, really are “hate groups,” because they tell us so.

If knuckleheads like White Lives Matter are such a threat, why won’t the SPLC post them on the “Hate Map” today? Why wait six months?

Well, it’s like this. The “Hate Map” is a fundraising tool, and as such it always refers to the previous year. The current SPLC “Hate Map” actually refers to existential threats from 2015. A little late to take up arms against the outrageous slings and arrows from last year, the “Hate Map” serves an important fundraising purpose. Media outlets from the New York Times, NPR, Time Magazine and the BBC will pick up the SPLC’s bogus “hate group” numbers and repeat them verbatim, ad nauseum, without ever performing even the most preliminary fact checks on the company’s claims.

If the SPLC were actually to create a dynamic tool the company would have to deal not only with scrutiny when it added “groups” to the “Hate Map,” but when they just as arbitrarily removed “groups” from the tool.

Case in point: In February, 2015, the SPLC designated 40 “hate groups” to New Jersey, giving it the fourth highest total in the land. This unsubstantiated claim led Mark Pitcavage, Intelligence Director for the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) to publicly challenge the reliability of the the numbers his brothers-in-arms at the SPLC were putting forth.

“According to Mark Pitcavage, director of investigative research at the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), the SPLC has a habit of counting single individuals as groups or chapters, which can give a skewed impression of hate groups in any given state.” [Emphasis added]

The Southern Poverty Law Center’s list is wildly inflated,” said Pitcavage. “They list skinhead groups in places where there are no organized groups, but instead it’s just a couple of individuals.” [Emphasis added]

After being publicly humiliated by the ADL, the SPLC reduced its “hate group” count for New Jersey from 40 to 21, due largely to the arbitrary removal of 13 chapters of the AC Skins skinhead group that the company swore was a threat to all that we hold dear in 2015.

AC skins

The beauty of the “static map” system is that even though the ADL debunked the SPLC’s New Jersey claims in March of 2015, the reduction to the “Hate Map” didn’t come until February, 2016, resulting in a full year of fundraising. That one year delay resulted in uncounted donor-dollars wafting their way into the SPLC’s already bloated coffers.

If the “Hate Map” served any purpose beyond agitating the company’s mostly elderly, mostly Progressive donor base, it would be accurate up to the minute.

This friends, is why the SPLC’s “Hate Map” fundraising tool only comes out once a year. It’s not about identifying “threats,” it’s about gulling the gullible. Give early and often and we’ll tell you all about it next year.

 

SPLC — Here comes the Klan… again!

August 24, 2016

Even with a presidential election year and the Olympics going on, summer is often a slow time for the Media machine. This helps to explain the recent spate of “news” articles based on bogus numbers from the Southern Poverty Law Center.

In late February, the SPLC released its annual “Hate Map” fundraising tool that proclaimed that “the number of ‘hate groups’ jumped by 14%” in 2015″. As usual, a closer look at the SPLC’s claims, something the Media couldn’t bother to do, reveals a different story.

In 2008, on the very week of Barack Obama’s historic election as President of the United States, SPLC public relations guru, Mark Potok, was predicting “explosive growth” in hate groups in retaliation for “the tanking economy” and “a Black man in the White House.”

In 2009, the first year of the Obama Administration, Potok managed to scrape up 6 new “hate groups,” the smallest increase in SPLC history. In 2010, Potok added 70 new groups, but in that same year the number of “homeless hate groups,” those alleged groups which Mr. Potok cannot even locate on any map, including his own, jumped by 99, effectively producing a net loss.

After adding a token number of “groups” in 2011, Potok’s numbers plummeted 22% in the years following “a Black man’s reelection to the White House.” Obviously, declines like this are bad for business, and it’s probably no coincidence that the SPLC found that donations, which averaged $54 million dollars for 2013 and 2014, had dropped to a mere $30 million for 2015.

Faced with that kind of hemorrhaging, Mark Potok did the logical thing and fired up the “hate group” machine, which had never failed to bring in the cash in the past. And so we get the mysterious “14% jump in hate groups,” even though the 2015 total is still below Potok’s 2008 numbers.

One of the two leading increases came from a huge spike in that old fundraising standby, the Ku Klux Klan. According to Mark Potok, “the Klan more than doubled (!!!)” in 2015, largely in retaliation for Confederate flags coming down around the South and Black Lives Matter.

What the Media choose to ignore is that Mark Potok is the guy who slashed his own Klan numbers “by more than half” from 163 in 2013 to only 72 in 2014. And he did so voluntarily. It’s not like he produces a single fact to back up any of his claims.

When you take into account that, according to Potok’s own numbers, the KKK “jumped” from 163 to 190 over two years, it is hardly noteworthy, especially when you look at Potok’s ridiculous Klan claims.

Texas, in particular, experienced a dubious tenfold expansion in Klan groups in 2015, from five to fifty, in just one year, due largely to the addition of the Texas Knights and the expansion of the United White Knights, with 13 Texas communities allegedly acquiring one chapter of each. That’s right, 13 Texas communities acquired TWO brand new Klan groups last year. That makes perfect sense.

From five to fifty, overnight? Really, Mr. Potok?

This becomes even more ludicrous in light of Mark Potok’s public pronouncements that the Klan was all but dead, which is even more astonishing considering Potok’s premature “explosive growth” predictions. Ooops! Here’s what the “nation’s leading expert” has to say about the Ku Klux Klan:

“The Klan of today is small, fractured, impotent and irrelevant,” Potok said.” (www.timesfreepress.com, September 12, 2010)

The Klan is a sorry shadow of its former self. It’s common for the KKK to brag about big numbers, but usually they are largely outnumbered by the counter-protestors, Potok said. Even on the white supremacist scene, the Klan is seen as less important today, he said.

‘They just don’t have the people to put on the street, no matter what they boast about,’ Potok said.” (www.chronicle.augusta.com, October 21, 2010)

The 2011 Hate Map included 221 alleged chapters of the KKK, (109 of which were “homeless”), and yet, within weeks of the map’s release, Mark Potok publicly pronounced the demise of the “Invisible Empire” for all intents and purposes.

“But Potok said the Klan has disintegrated. “There is no Klan now,” he said, only a collection of squabbling organizations.” (www.sanluisobispo.com, March 23, 2011)

And just a week ago…

“The Klan today is weak, poorly led and without any sort of centralized organization,” Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, told Vocativ. The SPLC tracks extremist groups like the KKK. “It’s even looked down upon by other hate groups – they look at them as these country bumpkins, and they’re generally right.” (www.vocativ.com, August 18, 2016)

And what do Potok’s peers in the Hate Industry think about his numbers?

“According to Mark Pitcavage, director of investigative research at the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), the SPLC has a habit of counting single individuals as groups or chapters, which can give a skewed impression of hate groups in any given state.”

“The [SPLC’s] list is wildly inflated,” said Pitcavage. “They list skinhead groups in places where there are no organized groups, but instead it’s just a couple of individuals.”

As veteran extremist group researcher, Laird Wilcox, warned us back in 1998:

“What [the SPLC] apparently did was list any group they could find mention of, including groups only rumored to exist. These included the large number of “post office box chapters” maintained by Klan and skinhead organizations. Some Christian Identity “ministries” consist only one person and a mailing list and many “patriot groups” consist of but three or four friends.

They also listed many groups whose actual affiliation is neither KKK nor neo-Nazi and who would argue with the designation of “white supremacy.” In short, they misleadingly padded their list. When the SPLC releases their list, either in print or on the Internet, it fails to contain actual addresses that might be checked by journalists or researchers. Several listings refer to “unknown group” and the name of a city or town.” — The Watchdogs, p. 79

Even Mark Potok had to admit to the post office box scam:

“Potok says inclusion on the [hate group] list might come from a minor presence, such as a post office box.” (www.sanluisobispo.com, March 25, 2009)

And there you have it, right from the horse’s mouth. When the SPLC is losing money at the donor level the first thing it does is to trot out the tired, moth-eaten Ku Klux Klan to bring in the cash. It’s pathetic, but it works like a charm.

Nobody ever went poor selling zombies to the American public.

Next time we’ll have a look at the second major “cause” of Potok’s “14% jump in hate groups,” Black hate groups, which, according to  Mark Potok, outnumber the Klan outright and neo-Nazis, racist Skinheads and White Nationalists COMBINED.

Talk about “retaliation” for Black Lives Matter…

Stay tuned for that stupidity.

The SPLC’s “Lone Wolf” Lunacy and the DHS

February 16, 2015

In its latest fear-mongering fundraising foray, the Southern Poverty Law Center has finally come out and stated the obvious: It’s not so-called “hate groups” that pose the greatest threat of violence today, it is the “lone wolf” lunatic.

As it turns out, an even greater threat to the American public is the extent to which the SPLC has insinuated itself into the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as an alleged source of reliable data. More on this to follow.

First, let’s have a look at “Age of the Wolf,” a “report” written by SPLC staffer Ryan Lenz and edited by Public Relations Chief Mark Potok.

Click Image to Enlarge

Click Image to Enlarge

The “report” is filled with the usual “may-might-could” fundraising alarums familiar in Mr. Potok’s writing and repeats a point he made as far back as 2008:

“And I would say as a general matter, it is extremely unusual these days for an organization to plan and carry out a criminal act where mainly for the reason that they are so likely to get caught. So what we really see out there in terms of violence from the radical right is by and large what we would call lone wolves, people operating on their own or with just one or two partners. As opposed to, you know, being some kind of organizational plan.” (www.npr.org, October 30, 2008) [Emphasis added]

And:

“Still, [Potok] said the public should remain vigilant about the activities of hate groups, even though individuals are responsible for the majority of hate crimes in America. (www.courier-journal.com, July 21, 2009) [Emphasis added]

Individuals are responsible for the majority of hate crimes in America, but that has not prevented Mr. Potok from issuing his highly lucrative “hate group” “Hate Map” every year.

As we’ve demonstrated numerous times on this blog, and as Mr. Potok even admitted to us personally on video, the “Hate Map” is a fundraising tool and, in Mr. Potok’s own words, “anecdotal,” “an imperfect process” and “a very rough estimate.”

Potok continues to designate “hate groups” to populate his “Hate Map” because that is where the money is.

The media regurgitates his meaningless numbers without ever performing even the most rudimentary fact checks, Potok’s Progressive donor base gets agitated and out come the checkbooks. Works like a charm every time.

What is most troubling about “Age of the Wolf” is that it reinforces a dangerous trend we first reported on back in 2012. The report is full of soft, nebulous bogey-words such as “extremist,” “Right-wing” and “far right,” which are largely subjective terms intentionally skirting  legal definition as much as possible. They frighten the donors without risking litigation.

The problem comes with the frequent use of the term “domestic terrorist,” which actually does have a legal definition, even though Mr. Potok largely ignores it in his report.

While the FBI does not, cannot designate “hate groups,” the DHS has every right to investigate any potential source of “terrorism” and, as we’ve seen in the past, doesn’t necessarily bother with a lot of Constitutional niceties in the process.

Being branded a “hate group” by the SPLC carries a stigma. Being branded a “terrorist” has legal repercussions.

“Age of the Wolf” concedes the obvious repeatedly, with such provisos as:

 “Analyzing terrorism comes fraught with pitfalls. There is no hard and fast agreement on what constitutes a terrorist action. What if the attack has a political dimension, but is carried out by someone who is clearly mentally ill? [Emphasis added]

Is a rampage killing spree terrorism or simply an eruption of personal hatreds? Does the murder of three police officers responding to a domestic disturbance count, even if the killer does have a long history in the police-hating anti-government movement?”

 Obviously, to a veteran fundraiser and fear-monger like Mr. Potok, the answer to those questions is a resounding “Close enough!” to warrant inclusion in a list of incidents in the report.

The FBI has a rather more stringent, three-pronged definition:

“Domestic terrorism” means activities with the following three characteristics:

  1. Involve acts dangerous to human life that violate federal or state law;

  2. Appear intended (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; (ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or (iii) to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination. or kidnapping; and

  3. Occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction of the U.S.”

An event has to meet all three requirements before the FBI considers it a possible terrorist act, but the incidents on Mr. Potok’s list tend to focus mainly on the first and third criteria, while leaving the second characteristic pretty much up for interpretation.

Such broad interpretations are key to Mr. Potok’s standard M.O., whereby he breathlessly claims to have collected thousands of “hate incidents,” not hate crimes, most of which often do not pan out under closer examination. These are nothing more than standard Potokian fundraising hyperbole, designed to separate the donors from their dollars.

The serious part of “Age of the Wolf” comes at the end of the report in the “Related Studies” section.

To boost the credibility of his claims, Mr. Potok cites six recent studies that discuss domestic terrorism. Potok states:

“In recent years, a number of studies from sources inside and outside of federal government have warned of the threat of increased violence from the radical right, with many specifically addressing lone wolf attackers inspired by ideologies of hate and other extremism. What follows is a description of several of the studies.”

What Mr. Potok neglects to mention, however, is the incestuous relationship between the authors of these reports and his own Southern Poverty Law Center. Even more troubling is that several of them were funded by the DHS.

Before we delve into Mr. Potok’s reports, a quick word about a separate 2014 report Watching the Watchdogs stumbled upon two weeks ago.

In “The Relationship Between Hate Groups and Far-Right Ideological Violence,” published in the academic Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, JCCJ, (which you can download here), the four authors examine “whether the presence of hate groups increases the likelihood of serious ideologically motivated violence committed by far-rightists.”

That wording alone was enough to set off alarm bells, but reading further into the abstract, we read that:

“We test the relationship using data from the Extremist Crime Database (ECDB) for the dependent measure, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) for the hate groups measure, and various other sources for additional variables.”

As Mark Potok has already explained to us in person, his “hate group” statistics are “anecdotal,” “an imperfect process” and “a very rough estimate.” How then, we wondered, could any serious study incorporate such shoddy data and come up with academically rigorous results?

After all, we had already reported on a similar “study” published by the Social Science Quarterly in 2012 that attempted to use Mr. Potok’s fundraising propaganda to prove the correlation between the presence of a Walmart in any given county with the subsequent appearance of a “hate group” on Mr. Potok’s “Hate Map” in that same county a decade later. This was junk science at its worst.

In the days before “Age of the Wolf” was posted, we had already emailed each of the four authors of the JCCJ report to ask them why they used SPLC numbers in their report. The wording to all four authors, Amy Adamczyk, Jeff Gruenewald, Steven M. Chermak, and Joshua D. Freilich, (remember these names), was identical and, we thought, quite civil and polite:

“Prof. _____, I have just read your 2014 article “The Relationship Between Hate Groups and Far-Right Ideological Violence,” in which you, Adamczyk, Chermak, et al, state in the abstract that you included data from “the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) for the hate groups measure.”

Could you or one of your colleagues explain the methodology for vetting the SPLC’s data? I’m also interested in the working definition of “hate group” your team used for the study, as I was unable to find it within the text.

Thank you for your consideration,”

Ten days later and we’ve yet to hear anything from any of the authors. As we soon discovered, there seems to be a very good reason for the silence.

As for the funding for the article, “This research was supported by the Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) through START.”

START is the National Consortium for the Studies of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism at the University of Maryland, “established in 2005 as a U.S. Department of Homeland Security Center of Excellence, tasked with utilizing state-of-the-art theories, methods, and data from the social and behavioral sciences to improve the understanding of the origins, dynamics, and social and psychological impacts of terrorism.”

START was funded by an initial $12 million grant from DHS to complete projects in the research areas of terrorist group formation and recruitment, terrorist group persistence and dynamics, and societal responses to terrorist threats and attacks.”

All four academics associated with the JCCJ report are members of the START team and therefore dependent on the DHS for much of their funding.

Of the six reports cited by “Age of the Wolf,” five of them were co-authored by Chermak and Freilich of the START team and four of the reports cite the SPLC as a principle source of “hate group” data.

As for the other primary source of data for the JCCB report, the Extremist Crime Database (ECDB)it was created by START members Chermak, Freilich and Gruenewald. And who financed this impartial resource? “Part of this research was supported by the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS)… and …[START].”

So, at the end of the day, we have Mark Potok’s “Age of the Wolf” fundraising screed, which cites multiple reports by several START researchers, who cite Mr. Potok’s “Hate Map” hogwash in their reports to the DHS, which is the primary source of funding for START.

Just as Mr. Potok’s “hate group” label is worth millions to the SPLC, it certainly appears that DHS funding is worth millions to START. What would happen to that funding if the START researchers determined that Mr. Potok’s numbers were lacking in credibility?

Impartial? You be the judge. Incestuous? Cue the banjos.

SPLC – The [white] Beat Goes On…

September 19, 2013

Today the SPLC proudly announced the accession of Lisa Sahulka to the six-digit salary post of Chief Operating Officer for the esteemed “civil rights” organization.

sahulkajpg-35e5f784fd577ce2

 

Ms. Sahulka perpetuates a FOUR-DECADES-LONG policy of hiring only white candidates to the esteemed “civil rights” organization’s Executive Suite.

When the SPLC’s hometown newspaper, the Montgomery Advertiser, had the temerity to ask SPLC founder Morris Dees why there were no minority executives working at the famed “civil rights” organization as late as 1994, (23 years after Mr. Dees opened the doors of the esteemed institution…), Mr. Dees replied, “It is not easy to find black lawyers. Any organization can tell you that.”

Apparently, nearly 20 years later, it’s not easy to find black executives, fundraisers or computer programmers either, which is why the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Executive Suite is as lily-white today as when Mo Dees opened the doors in 1971.

It reminds us of the NFL/NBA’s hollow protests for forty years that “Well, we would hire black General Managers, only there aren’t any…”

Some things just don’t change in Montgomery, and if Morris “Atticus Finch” Dees has any say in the matter, they never will.

Remember folks, send the SPLC all the money you can afford, early and often. They’re down to their last quarter-BILLION tax-free dollars.

 

 

 

SPLC — “…Abhorrent, self-centered, self-righteous, money grubbing bigots…”

April 1, 2012

The Southern Poverty Law Center is one of the most profitable “non-profits” in the country today, and it pretty much has a free pass in almost every mainstream media outlet, where its spurious “data” is almost never questioned.

Fortunately the Blogosphere is less gullible and criticism of the SPLC’s dubious “reports” and fundraising practices comes from all across the political and social spectrum.

Recently, the Closet Professor blog, written by a long-time resident of Montgomery, Alabama, home to the SPLC’s corporate headquarters, posted text from an SPLC anti-gay “hate group” report, followed by his own impressions of the SPLC. The post is interesting because the author, as a gay academic, is more representative of the SPLC’s donor demographic than those with legitimate criticisms of their fundraising tactics.

You can read the professor’s comments here.

You can learn a lot about an organization by hearing what the neighbors have to say.

A Great Source for SPLC Information

August 7, 2011

Watching the Watchdogs is only one of a myriad number of groups around the country who seek to expose the public relations practices, highly questionable fund-raising tactics and dangerous media manipulations of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

One such group is the Georgia Heritage Council, who have compiled a listing of excellent articles on the SPLC as well as many other players in the alphabet-soup Hate Industry.

Watching the Watchdogs is pleased to share a link to this excellent resource.

Although the Internet has allowed the SPLC to reach more unwitting donors and witless media outlets, the growing body of facts and figures that can be found online may ultimately prove to be their downfall.

SPLC — Send Millionaire Mo money for his birthday

December 16, 2009

December 16 is the birthday of Klan lawyer and Southern Poverty Law Center founder, millionaire Morris Dees.

For those who may have forgotten the big day, the SPLC has sent out a special reminder that also doubles as a fund-raising tool.

For a cash donation, you can send Mr. Dees a personalized birthday greeting.  “We’ll make sure he receives your message” promises the pitch. You have no way of verifying this claim, but hey, has the SPLC ever lied to you before?

For as little as ten dollars, you too can “honor” Mr. Dees’ “tireless crusade for justice and tolerance.” A bargain at twice the price.

But wait! There’s more! If you commit to a monthly donation payment plan, you can “join a special group called Friends of the Center.” What better way to honor the lawyer who has gotten more Klansmen OUT of prison than he’s ever sent there?

“Special Friends” get their names projected on the Wall of Tolerance at SPLC headquarters, an honor exceeding even that of joining Potok’s Pinheads on the Stand Strong Against Hate map.

As Mr. Dees points out in his autobiography, A Season for Justice, this ol’ Alabama farm boy made his first fortune while still in law school. After graduation, Mr. Dees created one of the most successful mail-order companies of the 1960s. So successful, in fact, that soon after getting Montgomery Klansman Claude Henley off scot-free from federal charges of attacking a busload of Freedom Riders, Dees closed his law office in order to concentrate on the world of direct mail full-time.

As the decade of the 60s wound down to a close, Dees sold the business for six million dollars. Mr. Dees has been a millionaire for the nearly forty years since.

The SPLC has enjoyed support in the range of $26 million to $30 million donor dollars for each of the past five years, in addition to nearly matching amounts from the interest on their $156 MILLION donor dollar Endowment Fund, (although the fund did take a nearly $50 million dollar hit last year, dropping it from a record $201 million).

As reported here just recently, of the $30 million donor dollars the SPLC took in last year, only $1.36 million, or 4.5%, went to actual “legal case costs”. Meanwhile, the SPLC spent $1.88 million donor dollars on fund-raising postage.

So dig deep, friends. Fund-raising postage costs are bound to go up again next year. Millionaire Morris Dees scrapes by on a paltry compensation of $350,000 a year, (including the $20,000 donor dollar raise he gave himself in 2008), and $10,000 a pop for his frequent speaking engagements.

Honor Millionaire Mo for his achievements, like the Direct Marketing Association did when they named him to their fund-raising Hall of Fame. It’s only money.

Happy Birthday, Mr. Dees!

More “Tolerance” from the SPLC

November 13, 2009

When CNN’s Lou Dobbs announced on November 11 that he was stepping down from that network, one could almost hear the shouts of joy ringing out from Montgomery.

“Damn, if we haven’t done it again!”

The reason for all the glee? The ever-tolerant Southern Poverty Law Center had added its mite to the war on silencing anyone who disagrees with those who are making millions off the backs of illegal aliens.

Yesterday, yet another fund-raising letter from multimillionaire Dick Cohen arrived in the e-mail, crowing about how the SPLC had silenced another dissident.

“Can’t have free speech breaking out around here. It might foment “hate” and so we’ll just have to bludgeon all “wrong thinkers” early and often. Oh, and by the way, here’s how you can send us more money…”

If it were not for the fact that so many elderly people, on fixed incomes, believe the SPLC’s public relations releases and send in tens of millions of donor dollars a year, Cohen’s spiel would be laughable.

Dobbs, it seems, “used his platform to spread myths and propaganda,” sez Cohen, from his platform.

Dobbs was “poisoning the debate over immigration reform,” says the SPLC, which routinely smears anyone who stands to the right of its ultra left-wing policies as “anti-immigrant,” “nativist,” “white supremacist,” and of course, whenever two or more are gathered, as a “hate group”.

And Dobbs was “inciting fear and hate against Latinos,” but no mention is made, either in the PR press release or on the SPLC website, of the fact that thanks to the hate-filled rhetoric of the SPLC, La Raza and others making money off the illegal alien industry, someone fired a shot at Lou Dobbs and his wife in October.

Tolerance is a beautiful thing, baby.

Cohen continues by stating that Dobbs got his information from the Federation for American Immigration Reform, (FAIR), a group the SPLC has designated as a “hate group”. Cohen, realizing full well that the term “hate groups” is meaningless as it has no legal definition, even the FBI doesn’t track “hate groups” for that reason. A “hate group” is pretty much whatever Cohen and his fellow multimillionaires at the Center, Dees and Levin, deem it to be.

(In March 2008, SPLC public relations guru, Mark Potok summed up the SPLC’s official definition of what exactly constitutes a “hate” group by stating that “…a “hate group” has nothing to do with criminality[or] potential for violence…” Rather, as Potok put it, “It’s all about ideology.”)

Basically, if you disagree with their ideology, the SPLC will smear you as a “hate group”.

Naturally, Cohen’s note ends with a link where folks can send him more money. The SPLC has fallen on hard times, due to the current recession, and is down to its last $156 MILLION, tax-free donor dollars, so your help has never been more important.

Remember folks, the first million donor dollars you send in has to be split between Cohen, Dees and Levin, who have all been multimillionaires for decades.

Only you can fight free speech in America. Give ’til it hurts

—————————————————————————————————

Southern Poverty Law Center
Nov. 12, 2009Dear Friend,

Last night, CNN anchor Lou Dobbs announced his departure from the network. As you know, we’ve been highly critical of Dobbs because he has used his platform to spread myths and propaganda — poisoning the debate over immigration reform and inciting fear and hate against Latinos.

The SPLC was one of the first groups to bring public attention to Dobbs’ use of false information provided by racist hate groups.

With your support, we exposed his wildly inaccurate reporting about immigrants — such as his insistence that immigrants had brought thousands of new cases of leprosy to the United States during a recent three-year period.

And we condemned his reliance on the Federation for American Immigration Reform as an authority on immigration issues. This is an organization we have named a hate group with longtime ties to white supremacists.

This past July, we called on CNN executives to fire Dobbs after he relentlessly promoted the racist and utterly baseless idea that President Obama is not a native-born American citizen. Soon thereafter, a number of other organizations joined our call.

Immigration reform is an important and complex issue, one that should be debated honestly. We hope that Dobbs’ resignation sends a message to other commentators that the airwaves shouldn’t be used to vent extremist rhetoric and fan the flames of hate. Doing so has serious and sometimes violent consequences, as illustrated by the rise in hate crimes against Latinos and the unprecedented number of threats against Obama.

We are committed to exposing those who disseminate misinformation that foments hate. Together, we took a stand, and our actions made a difference. Thank you for everything you do to combat bigotry and intolerance.

Richard Cohen photo Thank you for your support,
Richard Cohen
J. Richard Cohen
President, Southern Poverty Law Center

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